#WTSLondon - Elite Women's Grand Final

It was one of the most dramatic races in series history, as world title favourites Gwen Jorgensen and Anne Haug crashed and struggled respectively. But in the end, nothing could take away from Non Stanford's incredible win at home. Here is the social wrap.

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  1. With just 13 points separating the elite women ahead of the Grand Final, it was always going to be a dramatic race to declide the Elite Women's title on Saturday, but no-one predicted just how crazy.
  2. It first started when second-ranked Anne Haug left the swim in last place, two minutes down on the leader, which put her out of World title contention.
  3. Then on the second lap, pre-race rankings leader Gwen Jorgensen crashed and while she initially tried to continue, retired from the race a few laps later.
  4. That put Non Stanford and Jodie Stimpson right in contention, except that by then it had been confirmed that Stanford had a 15-second penalty from T1 for not putting her wetsuit in the correct box.


  5. However from T2, Stanford was flying and established such a huge lead over the first two laps that when she did eventually take her penalty, she had a 100m lead on the rest of the field even after she completed it. Stanford’s win also created some unique history, as the first woman to win an Elite ITU World Championship in the year directly after winning an Under23 World Championship. Great Britain’s Alistair Brownlee is the only other athlete in ITU history to do so, he completed the double in 2008 and 2009. Stanford also became only the eighth athlete in 24 years of ITU World Championship races to clinch a world title at home.
  6. Behind Stanford though the race for podium places wasn't over as Aileen Reid, Sarah Groff, Emma Moffatt and Stimpson battled it out right until the final few hundred metres. But with a killer kick, it was Reid who claimed the silver, ahead of Moffatt - just over 12 months after she crashed out of the women's race at the London 2012 Olympic Games.
  7. Jodie Stimpson's fourth place was enough to seal her an overall silver series medal.
  8. While even though Anne Haug finished 35th, it was enough for her to claim the overall series bronze medal. It was the second year in a row that Haug has finished on the series podium, after she claimed silver in 2012.
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