Why countries bordering North Korea doesn't want to see it collapse.

bytengu4810 Views
Embed

  1. North Korean Flags (North Korea) from The World Flag Database
    North Korean Flags (North Korea) from The World Flag Database
  2. Picture comes from flags.net
  3. You might have heard North Korea in the news lately. North Korea is a totalitarian dictatorship, bordering China, Russia, South Korea and Japan, known for its bellicose behavior and threats of nuclear war.
  4. Currently, North Korea is under international sanctions for its nuclear and ballistic missile program. Despite being under sanctions, it hasn't stopped North Korea from conducting nuclear and ballistic missile tests.
  5. While the U.S., Japan and South Korea publicly taking about the threat North Korea poses and wanting the government to collapse, in private nobody wants to see it happen.
  6. South Korea's stance on North Korea
  7. It is expected that after North Korea collapses it will be incorporated into South Korea. Once incorporated into South Korea it will be South Korea's responsibility to bring North Korea's economy in line with its own. The cost of bringing North Korea's economy in line with South Korea's will be costly. While North North doesn't release any economic data, The World Factbook estimates that North Korea's GDP is around $25 billion while South Korea's GDP is $1.4 trillion.
  8. Aside from fixing North Korea's economy, it is expected that those loyal to the North Korean regime will fight South Korea's attempts at change.
  9. The giph above show the difference in power consumption between the two Korea's. The dark area is North Korea. Giph comes from imgflip.com
  10. China's stance on North Korea
  11. During the Korean War (1950-1953) China provided economic, political and military aid and continues to provide aid. The reason why China supports North Korea is it sees North Korea as a buffer against western ideas (democracy and capitalism) and a U.S. military presence on its border. Another reason why China supports North Korea is the fear of North Korean refugees flooding across its border. It's easier for North Korean's to cross into China since the North-South Korean border is considered the most heavily militarized border in the world with landmines, electrifed fences, machine gun posts and other deadly traps.
  12. Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge - Wikipedia
    Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge - Wikipedia
  13. The picture above shows the Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge which connects China with North Korea. The bridge was built to strengthen economic ties between the two.
  14. Picture comes from Wikipedia.org
  15. Japan's stance on North Korea
  16. Japan sees South Korea as an economic and political rival. It's expected that North Korea will be incorporated into South Korea after it collapses. Once incorporated, South Korea will double in size, population and gain natural resources. For Japan, this is unacceptable because it is worried that South Korea will apply economic pressure on it to solve disputes. One area of dispute is The Laincourt Rocks. The Liancourt Rocks are a group of islands controlled by Japan but contested by South Korea. The Liancourt Rocks is important to both nations becuase of its nearby natural resources.
  17. The Liancourt Rocks: Takeshima (竹島) | Politics for the Eyes
    The Liancourt Rocks: Takeshima (竹島) | Politics for the Eyes
  18. The picture above show The Liancourt Rocks which is disputed between Japan and South Korea.
  19. Russia's stance on North Korea
  20. Russia's stance on North Korea is similiar to China's. Russia has provided economic, political and military aid to North Korea from the 1950s to present. Russia's reason for supporting North Korea is it sees North Korea as a buffer against the U.S. Without North Korea, the U.S. can redeploy its military to areas Russia has a presence; Syria, Ukraine, the Baltics. For Russia, having a large foreign military presence near its borders and overseas bases is unacceptable. Russia has a naval base and airforce base in Syria and Ukraine and the Baltics border Russia.
Like
Share

Share

Facebook
Google+