Day of DH <strike>Blogging</strike> Tweeting

It would have been optimistic to hope for some blogging today, but at least there was a bit of micro-blogging.

  1. This is my fourth DayOfDH – you can see my blogs for 2009, 2010, and 2011. Some common themes emerge, such as the admission,  yet again, that my day often starts with a skim through my Twitter stream, almost entirely dominated by DH colleagues and students.
  2. *yawn* *reaches to night table to grab ithing and read twitter stream* *wonders if younger followers recognize muddy origins of** #dayofdh
  3. I probably should have forked that in two posts, one one my bad morning habits and a separate one on the practice of surrounding verbs and short descriptions by asterisks, which I associate with MUD and MOO environments of the early 80s and 90s, which had narrative descriptions like *smiles* and *grins* (though maybe that notation pre-dates MUDs). Some of my earliest experiences with educational technologies in the 90s involved developing MUD worlds for language teaching at the University of Victoria – having students explore a world and interact with one another, both locally and remotely in written exchanges.
  4. Next is the recurring motif of coffee and my tradition of posting a picture of my beloved espresso machine.
  5. it wouldn't be #dayofdh (for me) without a picture of my java server http://pic.twitter.com/BqvX7qUU
    it wouldn't be #dayofdh (for me) without a picture of my java server pic.twitter.com/BqvX7qUUom/BqvX7qUU
  6. This is the first year I've participated in DayOfDH from Montreal – we moved hear this past summer. Life is wonderful here, though I think the lighting was better in our kitchen area in Dundas – more shadows but some nice lighting in the picture from last year:
  7. This isn't quite chronological, but before we leave the topic of coffee, I may as well jump to my second espresso later in the morning, this time at Caffè Art Java.
  8. espresso #2 (this one's not my machine, alas, but is just downstairs from my office) #dayofdh http://pic.twitter.com/MU73Qk8y
    espresso #2 (this one's not my machine, alas, but is just downstairs from my office) #dayofdh pic.twitter.com/MU73Qk8yom/MU73Qk8y
  9. Anyway, I tweeted a quick message when I arrived at my office and mentioned the nice natural lighting.
  10. dog walked, check; kids dropped off, check; commute, check; lots of natural light in office, check #dayofdh http://pic.twitter.com/daDN0Mep
    dog walked, check; kids dropped off, check; commute, check; lots of natural light in office, check #dayofdh pic.twitter.com/daDN0Mepom/daDN0Mep
  11. This touched off a bit of a flurry of people commenting on my view and spacious digs. I really, honestly, truthfully didn't mean to boast about it, though I do certainly appreciate it.
  12. @sgsinclair sweet christmas, thats a great view. you wanna trade offices?
  13. @sgsinclair That was rash! I can almost guarantee that one of your twitter followers is now planning to do away w/ you & take that office.
  14. And for those of us who aren't @sgsinclair and have to hack our cubicles . . .  http://twitpic.com/92069i
    And for those of us who aren't @sgsinclair and have to hack our cubicles . . .  http://twitpic.com/92069i 2069i
  15. I tried to make amends, but too late. The invitation to visit still stands, though.
  16. would an open invitation to come visit (with security check) assuage y'all? ;) #dayofdh
  17. Anyway, to work.
  18. today is very unusual in that I have an all-day research meeting for the Toucher project (Textes, Outils, Chercheurs en Réseau) #dayofdh
  19. No kidding it's unusual to have the luxury of an all-day research meeting. The closest that sometimes comes is travelling to conferences, presentations and meetings, but that doesn't seem nearly as luxurious (in terms of time), because it tends to involve a lot of interruptions and annoyances of travel. It's especially unusual to have a full day in my home city. But of course, any such luxury comes at a cost, including piling up email. In this case it also meant that I wasn't really able to maintain a blogging schedule – we were working as a team, and it wouldn't have seemed quite right to excuse myself for twenty minute blocks to keep up with the blogging.
  20. I knew this in advance, of course, which is why I thought I'd have more chance of sending a few tweets with the #dayofdh hashtag (I found out today l'Office de la langue française recommends mot-clic for hashtag in French). It started out fairly well, as I described the current work in a bit more detail.
  21. we have a Voyant tool that allows colleagues to categorize occurrences of a term & click on words that contribute to categorization #dayofdh
  22. here's an example  http://voyant-tools.org/tool/KwicsTagger/?corpus=1332854959530.8379&query=people org/tool/KwicsTagger/?corpus=1332854959530.8379&query=people – this is similar to the categordayofdh tool we built in Monk, but with additional tagging #dayofdh
  23. we'll do some text mining on the results, but right now (this morning) I'm just scripting some basic reporting  http://img.ly/fQjV dadayofdh
  24. I didn't really explain this in detail, but the particularity of this Voyant Tool is that it accepts and records additional information provided by users/readers after the corpus has been created. With all other tools you can analyze and explore existing data, but you can't really add additional data to the corpus – in this case we're tagging specific occurrences with additional information.
  25. After that initial flurry, I didn't really say much about our work day, though it was definitely productive. Once again I had the experience that significant progress often requires extended periods of in-person exchanges – that's not always possible, but if the situations can be created, it's well worth it. Especially when you can combine work and enjoyable social interactions, like lunch at Olivieri Librarie et Bistro.
  26. one of the best aspects of some collaborative projects: eating a nice meal together #dayofdh http://pic.twitter.com/duiRbSnt
    one of the best aspects of some collaborative projects: eating a nice meal together #dayofdh pic.twitter.com/duiRbSntom/duiRbSnt
  27. That's Madeleine Jeay on the left, Dan Maher in the middle and Francis Gingras on the right. Our project is to explore texts, tools and researchers in networks for French literature from 1200 to 1800. I really enjoy working with this group, and it's one of the few projects where I'm the lone digital humanist (though I keep contaminating them more and more as time goes on).
  28. Our work-day wound down in mid to late afternoon and I left to go pick up the kids from school and daycare. I guess I could have tweeted retrospectively about aspects of our meeting, but by then the moment seemed to have past. Indeed, the past tense doesn't feel quite as natural as the present when I tweet.
  29. Anyway, I had a very pleasant last DH moment as Ryan Cordell mentioned some feedback on Voyant:
  30. @sgsinclair My students loved using Voyant to learn basic textual analysis. They were very savvy after a little guidance from @pfyfe
  31. @sgsinclair & one student described Voyant as “possibly the coolest online tool I’ve ever seen”-if you need a blurb for the homepage!