Our Changing Climate

A participatory environmental design project that engages San Francisco Bay Area communities with issues of climate change by integrating youth perspectives with social media.

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  1. N. Claire Napawan (@sf_opencity), Sheryl-Ann Simpson (wheretohere.com), and Brett Snyder (@brettlsnyder)
  2. In collaboration with Institute for Sustainable Economic, Educational, Environmental Design (I-SEEED) and funded by University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI).

  3. The impacts of climate change are well known to the academics who study them. To the average individual, however, predicted environmental change can be difficult to grasp, especially when they are described through regional and global effects such as species loss, ice cap melts, seasonal temperature and weather changes, and sea level rise. There is a need to better understand the sometime-subtle, local, and everyday ways in which people are experiencing climate change, as these impacts are often uneven, disproportionately impacting socially and economically vulnerable populations. In particular, children and youth (and particularly youth of color and youth living in areas with high rates of poverty) are disproportionately impacted by climate change globally; these youths will inherit the issues associated with global environmental change and are often excluded from the dialogues and debates that shape their built environments.

  4. Generously funded by the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) and in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Economic, Education, and Environmental Design (I-SEEED), this project seeks to engage community youth in the design and application of a digital community network entitled, ‘Our Changing Climate.’

  5. Important precedents for integrating resilience efforts with social media include the #OccupySandy...
  6. In the days after Superstorm #Sandy , relief organizations were overwhelmed by the chaos and enormous need. One group quickly emerged as a bright spot. While victims in New York's hardest hit neighborhoods were stuck in the cold and dark, volunteers from the spontaneously formed #OccupySandy became a widely praised lifeline.

#Occupy Sandy was "one of the leading humanitarian groups providing relief to survivors across #NYC and #NJ," as a government-commissioned study put it.

Yet the Red Cross, which was bungling its own aid efforts after the storm, made a decision that further hampered relief: Senior officials told staffers not to work with Occupy Sandy.

Red Cross officials had no concerns about Occupy Sandy's effectiveness. Rather, they were worried about the group's connections to the Occupy Wall Street protest movement.

Three Red Cross responders told ProPublica there was a ban. "We were told not to interact with Occupy," says one. While the Red Cross often didn't know where to send food, Occupy Sandy "had what we didn't: minute-by-minute information," another volunteer says.

The government-sponsored study that praised Occupy Sandy – written in 2013 for the Department of Homeland Security – also cites a prohibition: A Red Cross chief of volunteer coordination recalled that "he was told not to work with Occupy Sandy because of the affiliation with [Occupy Wall Street]," the study says. 
#hurricane #weather #truth #fact #quote #community #globalawakening #yourworld
    In the days after Superstorm #Sandy , relief organizations were overwhelmed by the chaos and enormous need. One group quickly emerged as a bright spot. While victims in New York's hardest hit neighborhoods were stuck in the cold and dark, volunteers from the spontaneously formed #OccupySandy became a widely praised lifeline. #Occupy Sandy was "one of the leading humanitarian groups providing relief to survivors across #NYC and #NJ," as a government-commissioned study put it. Yet the Red Cross, which was bungling its own aid efforts after the storm, made a decision that further hampered relief: Senior officials told staffers not to work with Occupy Sandy. Red Cross officials had no concerns about Occupy Sandy's effectiveness. Rather, they were worried about the group's connections to the Occupy Wall Street protest movement. Three Red Cross responders told ProPublica there was a ban. "We were told not to interact with Occupy," says one. While the Red Cross often didn't know where to send food, Occupy Sandy "had what we didn't: minute-by-minute information," another volunteer says. The government-sponsored study that praised Occupy Sandy – written in 2013 for the Department of Homeland Security – also cites a prohibition: A Red Cross chief of volunteer coordination recalled that "he was told not to work with Occupy Sandy because of the affiliation with [Occupy Wall Street]," the study says. #hurricane #weather #truth #fact #quote #community #globalawakening #yourworld

  7. And the participatory exhibition by Claire Napawan and Brett Snyder, #SFOPENCITY, which crowd-sourced community perspectives on the rapidly evolving physical and social environment in San Francisco for the Open City/Art City Conference at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in October 2014.

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