Facebook Chat -- Author Q/A on 'The Rise of Asian Americans'

On Wednesday, June 20, Pew Research Center Senior Writer D'Vera Cohn took questions from our online audience in a LIVE discussion on Facebook about the new report, 'The Rise of Asian Americans.' We've repurposed that conversation here in an easier-to-read format.

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  1. Hello, I’m D’Vera Cohn, and I’m glad to be here to talk about our report on Asian Americans. We’ve already got some questions lined up, including some sent via Twitter that we didn’t get to during our event yesterday. I’ll be taking more over the next hour. So let’s get started.
  2. Asian Americans have surpassed Hispanics as the fastest-growing new immigrant group. Our new survey finds Asian Americans are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country, and they place a greater value on marriage, parenthood, hard work and career success. pewrsr.ch/KIJP63
  3. Thanks for conducting the survey in the 1st place. Good starting point. On the measurement of happiness & prosperity, did Pew factor in the economic crisis impact, if any, on the Asian/Asian-American communities & recent surveys indicating 1 in 3 Korean Americans don't have access to health care & many Vietnamese-Americans are having mental health issues?
  4. We may do some work on the economic crisis in future reports. We did not look at health topics as part of our research.
  5. Surveys & polls' results are reductionist form of reality, but is a good starting point to begin a discussion, to dig deeper for a more nuanced, and rather complex, picture of realities (plural intentional.) The survey's Overview conveys &... confirms many stereotypes about Asians & Asian Americans, many of which are perpetuated by Asians & Asian Americans themselves, partly a self-fulfilling prophecy. Two examples, one personal, that put the results into question: Almost 1 in 3 Korean Americans do not have health insurance (APIA Health Forum); many Vietnamese refugees (the family I lived with) describe themselves as middle class even while living in cramped one-bedroom apartments in crime-ridden Tenderloin area of San Francisco. Pooled together, six of us at the time probably made over $70,000 a year. I'm glad Pew conducted the survey, but as usual, marketers & political campaign consultants (too lazy & ignorant) will only rely on & spout the reductionist version of reality I fear. Thank you.
  6. Sonny Le - Thanks for your comments.
  7. It doesn't appear that Pew has constructively responded to the concerns raised by numerous Asian American groups (foundasian.org/) regarding how the report was framed. Why?
  8. Keith Kamisugi: For anyone with questions like this, I'd encourage you to read the entire report rather than just the news headlines, which can't convey the entire picture. Our report -- all 200-plus pages -- includes a lot of detail about the attitudes and experiences (both favorable and unfavorable) within the Asian-American community. Our survey covered the entire population of Asian Americans. Our data include numbers not just about wealth but about poverty; not just about achievements but also about challenges. At our event yesterday, one of the scholars on a panel called it a "conversation-starter" - and that's what we hope it will be.
  9. @MikeBoard1200 Is the trend ONLY for legal immigration? How would it look if all types of immigration was considered?#AsianAmericans Our trend data from the American Community Survey include unauthorized immigrants—not all of them, but we think it’s a significant majority.
  10. Is there a different sentiment toward undocumented Asian Americans verses undocumented persons from Latin America? If so, is the sentiment based on the percentages of undocumented workers, and/or the favorable economic circumstances of many Asian immigrants?
  11. Angela Avery: Is there a different sentiment toward undocumented Asian Americans verses undocumented persons from Latin America? If so, is the sentiment based on the percentages of undocumented workers, and/or the favorable economic circumstances of many Asian immigrants? We didn't ask anything on our survey about this, so can't help you there. See my previous answers for stats on unauthorized Asian immigrants.
  12. Thank you. The report was outstanding and I appreciate your efforts in providing the insight about my fellow Americans.
  13. Thanks for your interest in this topic!
  14. @apaprogram how does this report on#AsianAmericans help race relations? Pew Research Center doesn’t do any issue advocacy. But we certainly hope that adding new facts to the conversation helps people understand the world around them.
  15. Here's the survey data about whether being Asian American helps or hurts...
  16. Here's the survey data about whether being Asian American helps or hurts...
  17. Another question on unauthorized immigration from Twitter @thomasvlopez Is immigration from Asian countries generally documented or undocumented?@pewresearch #AsianAmericans Our analysis finds that about 13-15% of the total Asian-American immigrant population is unauthorized; that compares with about 45% of Hispanic immigrants who are unauthorized. Looking at the total unauthorized-immigrant population, about 10-11% is Asian American and three-quarters is Hispanic.
  18. I heard in the news that there are more Asian populations compared to Hispanics. My questions is this: how important is the presence of Asian communities all across the US in regard to health care distributions?
  19. Sorry, we did not address this in our research.
  20. I breezed through the report really quickly. Is there discussion of how religion affects transnational relationships for Asian Americans?
  21. @Steve Hu: I breezed through the report really quickly. Is there discussion of how religion affects transnational relationships for Asian Americans? I can't answer that now, but stay tuned. The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life will publish a second report next month based on the same survey, which will look deeply at religious affiliations, beliefs and practices of Asian Americans.
  22. Thanks. I look forward to that report on religion. Good stuff!
  23. I am sure that the report will go into detail at least about the largest six country-of-origin groups - Asian Americans with roots in China, Japan, India, Korea, the Philippines and Vietnam.

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