Global Warning: The reactions

On Jan. 10, in collaboration with The Washington Post and McClatchy Newspapers, we published the results of a three-month investigation. The project received national attention, mentioned in media outlets and influential blogs in the national security scene.

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  1. Some within the U.S. government are bracing for climate change as one of the next major threats to national security. Is the U.S. ready for the coming risks?

    That's the question ten post-graduate student reporters set out to investigate. On Jan. 10, in collaboration with The Washington Post and McClatchy Newspapers, we published the results of a three-month project.
  2. The Washington Post published a story from the project, in which reporter Jacquelyn Ryan shows that the U.S. lacks important capacity to act in a warming Arctic.
  3. Getting some buzz on Twitter: Jessica Chen reports that diseases are "one of the most worrisome national security threats of climate change," while "significant gaps remain in the health surveillance and response network."
  4. Read the story on Global-Warning.org, on the McClatchy D.C. website, or on one of McClatchy's papers, such as the Kansas City Star.
  5. Users can get involved in five interactive elements and lots of multimedia on the Global Warning website.
  6. Andrew Revkin even retweeted our message to him
  7. Two of our stories are among the most emailed from McClatchy DC today: Jessica Chen explores the spreading disease threat, and Charles Mead and Annie Snider tell you why the CIA is spying on climate change.
  8. Bryan Walsh points to Global Warning in a post on Time.com's Ecocentric blog. He says that climate change -- and especially climate security -- stories have been neglected by the media.

    "But we'll need an engaged media—and public—watching how that response plays out over the years and decades to come. In a world of shrinking media resources and shorter attention spans, that won't be easy—but Medill's Global Warning project shows how it can be done."
  9. Want to hear from our reporters? Check out this piece on the Medill site, with thoughts from Malathi Nayak, who travelled to Bangladesh to examine how U.S. and foreign military prepare for climate threats, and Annie Snider, the first reporter to interview the head of the CIA Climate Change Center.
  10. The Society of Enviornmental Journalists published a link to one of our stories on their website.
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