The Recipes Project - Day 6

Potatoes, Croque Madame, lipsalve, and cake!

Embed

  1. The Recipes Conference has reached Day 6, and whilst today was quieter than some of the days before,it was certainly no less interesting and a lot more hands-on. We had a Croque Madamerecipe from Harry Hayfield, more potato planting from @Spuddenly_Farming, recipe recreations from Katherine Allen (@kallen622) that crossed from cosmetic to edible, and to round things up a live cook-along by Kierri Price with suggestions from the audience that made the end product unpredictable.
  2. First of all, Harry Hayfield gave us another insight into Musketeer Henri's life, and a recipe for Croque Madame. Not only a yummy breakfast item but a brilliant way to start the day.
  3. Then, @Spuddenly_Farming updated us on their experiment involving the humble potato, this time with the very scientific process of co-planting. (For the less scientific of us: luring in ladybugs with yummy marigolds and hoping the ladybugs eat all the nasty little potato bugs that would destroy all our hard work!)
  4. Next up, Katherine Allen (@KAllen622), tried recreating some 18th Century recipes. She started with lipsalve made with beeswax, raisins, apples, and orange blossom water. Are we sure this is a lipsalve recipe, and not a fancy dessert? Speaking of dessert, her next recreation was a beautiful pound cake that turned out deliciously!
  5. Today I reconstructed an 18th Century pound cake recipe and a lip salve remedy from Mary Wise's manuscript recipe book. Find out more at  https://raspberrythriller.wordpress.com/2017/06/24/reconstructing-18th-century-recipes/  #recipesconf #histmed #foodhistory
    Today I reconstructed an 18th Century pound cake recipe and a lip salve remedy from Mary Wise's manuscript recipe book. Find out more at https://raspberrythriller.wordpress.com/2017/06/24/reconstructing-18th-century-recipes/ #recipesconf #histmed #foodhistory
  6. Finally, Kierri Price started an interactive cooking session where she started with the developments of a cake mix and then let the audience take over. Six eggs turned into white and dark chocolate, marshmallows, and sprinkles courtesy of our youngest audience member. It also raises nice questions about recipes: are they still a recipe when they're created on the go or by a three year old at random, instead of written down beforehand?
Like
Share

Share

Facebook
Google+