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How to be a better photographer...

These are tips I accumulated for ds106.us (Digital Storytelling) activities with visual storytelling. Tweet me (@cogdog) your best suggestions and/or tag them #ds106.

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  1. Tips from Serena E: "I think my number one photography tip is to move your body instead of the camera whenever you can. Instead of zooming, move closer. Sometimes I intentionally leave behind the zoom lens when I travel. It forces me to get closer to my subjects & interact more."
  2. This was submitted to the googledoc we assembled last class:
    I started chasing your links, and I got so inspired I'm headed out the door with my camera! The links here are to pro tips, and it’s hard to do anything but reiterate my favorites, or least the ones that I am currently working with:
    * Constantly search for the odd angle--belly up, rooftop down.* Look for beauty in the quotidian.
    * Make photography part of your everyday workout!* When you catch a shot out of the corner of your eye, turn around and go back for it.
    * I love assignments such as The Daily Create or the Random Photography Assignment Generator.
    * Look at lots of art (photographs, paintings, comics, movies etc.). Figure out what you like about it. Copy what you like.
    * I once had the privilege of being on a field trip in Montana with the great Galen Rowell. As we looked out over the National Bison Range teeming with photographic potential, he said, “When you look through the lens, ask yourself, ‘What do I love about this image?’ and then compose the shot with that in mind.
  3. I bought TEN and it was well worth the $5!
  4. The power of Photography hrtbps: The 'Napalm Girl', 40 years later Joe McNally, who was commissioned by LIFE magazine to find and photograph subjects of Pulitzer Prize winning photos, shot Kim Phuc - the girl running from an airborne attack in this devastatingly iconic shot during the Vietnam War. The original photo was taken by AP photographer Nick Ut, and turned Kim into a propaganda tool for the anti-war movement.  Joe had the privilege of meeting and photographing Kim, who had recently given birth to her newborn son. Joe knew to treat the situation with care, since showcasing her scars from the napalm burn was significant. "For me, doing this assignment reconfirmed so many things I've always believed about photography," says Joe in his blog post "On a Road, 40 Years Ago". "That photo made on that horrible day was made in less than a second. Yet a lifetime spun on its power. With so many photographs being taken everywhere, easily, and thoughtlessly, it's easy to forget how powerful they can be, and occasionally are."
    The power of Photography hrtbps: The 'Napalm Girl', 40 years later Joe McNally, who was commissioned by LIFE magazine to find and photograph subjects of Pulitzer Prize winning photos, shot Kim Phuc - the girl running from an airborne attack in this devastatingly iconic shot during the Vietnam War. The original photo was taken by AP photographer Nick Ut, and turned Kim into a propaganda tool for the anti-war movement. Joe had the privilege of meeting and photographing Kim, who had recently given birth to her newborn son. Joe knew to treat the situation with care, since showcasing her scars from the napalm burn was significant. "For me, doing this assignment reconfirmed so many things I've always believed about photography," says Joe in his blog post "On a Road, 40 Years Ago". "That photo made on that horrible day was made in less than a second. Yet a lifetime spun on its power. With so many photographs being taken everywhere, easily, and thoughtlessly, it's easy to forget how powerful they can be, and occasionally are."
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