Disability & Accessibility at #4c17

Welcome to the archive of this year's (public) Conference on College Composition & Communication tweets that used the #4c17, #dis, & #access hashtags and/or were focused on disability and accessibility.

  1. The order of these tweets is predominantly chronological:

    1) Making CCCC Accessible
    2) Accessible Materials: Full-Text Scripts & Handouts
    3) Workshops and Conference Sessions.

    For conference sessions, I included panel titles, abstracts, and the names & presentation titles for individual speakers (as written in the official program) to make it easier to follow who presented. You can find presentations by session number, name, or title in this year's CCCC program:  http://www.ncte.org/cccc/review/2017program 

    Just keep scrolling & waiting for tweets to load. Enjoy!

  2. Making CCCC Accessible

  3. I *love* opening intro/welcome of #4C17 #a13, inviting attendees to "put your feet up, move around, knit…whatever you need to be present.”
  4. Loving from afar all the #4C17 tweets regarding access, disability, inclusivity and accommodation. Hope to see you all at #4C18! #rhetoric
  5. Come to the #access table next to registration today to learn about making your presentation accessible & pick up interaction cards! #4C17
  6. So happy to see captioning on the screens, as well as ASL on stage during the general session! #accessibility #4C17
  7. #DisabilityStudies panels at #4C17 are the best. Speakers invite you to use the space in a way that is comfortable for you. #h05
  8. Pengie checks out the Access Table to learn about the disability studies SIG and accessibility at #4c17! https://t.co/RDP1jGBPsb
    Pengie checks out the Access Table to learn about the disability studies SIG and accessibility at #4c17! pic.twitter.com/RDP1jGBPsb
  9. Presenters at #4c17, please please please please use the microphone. This is an accessibility issue. Thanks!

  10. Presenters: It may feel awkward, but please use the microphone. No matter how loud you talk we still can't hear you. #accessibility #4c17
  11. #4C17 folks, please consider sharing links to your scripts and slides for #CsTheCouch folks. For #accessibility, include image descriptions!

  12. Accessible Materials: Full-Text Scripts & Handouts

  13. Full-text of my #4c17 #dis talk: "'At Least I'm Not Insane': Practicing Radical #SelfCare in the Writing Classroom":  https://allisonhitt.wordpress.com/4c17/ 
  14. Check out the captioned video of my talk from #4C17: "Cultivating Disability Pre-Histories"  https://youtu.be/iN2aosUffEU  #disabilitystudies #dis

  15. Workshops and Conference Sessions

  16. W.05 "Rhetorics and Realities: Exploring New Potentials for Scholarly Production to Transform the Meaning of Scholarship (and the Meaning of Meaning within Our Field)"

  17. This workshop offers both presentations and hands-on training in new publishing platforms. It is designed to create a space for participants to discuss the issues/concerns that need to be addressed into our scholarly publications as well as provide them with the opportunity to learn about as well as to experiment with building alternative forms of scholarly production.
  18. Listening to Melanie Yergeau and Jackie Rhodes on publishing and making it more accessible. #W05 #4C17
  19. Melanie Yergeau: "Accessibility should be a beginning point, not an end point." #W05 #4C17
  20. Melanie Yergeau: "Logics of accommodation tends to be you're the special case that ruins things." #W05 #4C17
  21. Melanie Yergeau: accessibility requires reaching out and talking to people about what works for them. #W05 #4C17
  22. #4C17 @myergeau: Need to think about the many avenues that people access and process information, beginning with plain language.
  23. A.13: "Cultivating Critical Connections: Case Studies and Microhistories of Composition and Corporatization, Disability and Diversity"

  24. Four studies of four very different institutional contexts will be used to connect disability services and writing programs.
  25. Starting #4c17 with #A13 "Cultivating Critical Connections: Case Studies & Micro-histories of Comp & Corporatization, #dis & Diversity.
  26. excited for session #A13 on cultivation, corporatization, and "disabling" the institution #4C17
  27. Getting started at #A13, looking at case studies and microhistories of the corporatization of disability and diversity. #4c17
  28. Al Harahap, University of Arizona, “Cultivation, Clash, and Disabling the Institution”
  29. First up, Al Harahap with "Cultivation, Corporatization, and 'Disaling' the Institution" #a13 #4c17
  30. Starting with my friend Al Harahap, who was instrumental in my conversation to rhet/comp. THANKS AL! #4c17 #a13
  31. AH: Asks us to consider the "cultural moment" we're in, where globalization isn't the same thing as corporatization. #4c17 #a13
  32. AH: Globalization is a continuation of colonization, while corporatization is a continuation of capitalism. #4c17 #a13
  33. Al Harahap: globalization is a continuation of colonization: hoarding of resources, regulating immigration, othering of cultures #4c17 #a13
  34. AH: How does this sociocultural, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical moment bear down on academia as an institution? #4c17 #a13
  35. Higher education and issues of globalization right now in #a13 #dis #4C17
  36. AH points out the assumptions shown by even just getting here--how did we find this room? Why does the stage only have stairs? #4c17 #a13
  37. Al Harahap: when challenging institutions, we must maintain visibility and presence within struggle (Giroux, 2001). #4c17 #a13
  38. Al Harahap: how does our socio-cultural, economic, political moment bear down upon the academic institution (& accessibility)? #dis #4c17
  39. No ramp to the podiums at #a13 is a big issue. And it always is! #dis #4C17
  40. AH: Universal design is being hailed as a harbinger of inclusivity & access, but it really renders difference invisible. #4c17 #a13
  41. Universal design "hailed as harbinger of inclusivity" but does NOT tune into difference. #a13 #dis #4C17
  42. AH invokes Sullivan, Porter, et al's concept of institutional critique as an instrument for change. #4c17 #a13
  43. Al Harahap: disabling the institution is one way for us to destablize our definitions of student, teacher, instructor, etc. #a13 #dis #4C17
  44. AH: At U of AZ, there are 2 disability support service units: Disability Resource Ctr & Strategic Alternative Learning Techniques #4c17 #a13
  45. AH: Cultural operations in motion: access values vs corporate values; inter-regionalizations moveing towards globalization #4c17 #a13
  46. Harahap: There is a clash between access values & corporate (institutional) values. #dis #4c17
  47. Al Harahap reveals how campus services often play into nationalism/neoliberalism; clash of access values and corporate values. #4c17 #a13
  48. AH: Stratification creates a system to rank persons & groups based on socioeconomic position, which is a constructed value system #4c17 #a13
  49. Al Harahap looks to different campus resources that claim to do the same things, but one is free and the other is not. #4c17 #A13
  50. Al Harahap: corporate values create institutional stratification; ranks disabled people by socioeconomic position. #a13 #dis #4C17
  51. AH: Does difference cause stratification or vice versa? It's a vicious cycle. One of the disability services is free, one costs. #4c17 #a13
  52. Al Harahap: paid campus services = "a system that ranks persons/groups by socioeconomic position & constructed value system" #4c17 #a13
  53. Andrew Lucchesi, Western Washington University, “Cultivating Disability Prehistories”
  54. Andrew Lucchesi up next with "Cultivating Disility Pre-Histories" at #a13 #dis #4C17
  55. @AJLucchesi : "Cultivating Disability Pre-Histories: When Student Bodies Entered General Education:  http://tinyurl.com/prehistory2017  #dis #4c17
  56. AL: Disability (as articulated by services offered through student services) was "born" in 1946. #4c17 #a13
  57. Lucchesi: CCNY disability services began in 1946 as a service to disabled veterans, focused on rehabilitation of the body. #a13 #dis #4C17
  58. .@AJLucchesi examines the history of disability services at #CUNY; starts in 1946 with vet rehab w/ focus on "fixing the body" #4c17 #a13
  59. One of the first disability services appeared at City College in 1946 #4C17 #A13
  60. @AJLucchesi: CCNY created disability services in 1946 to ensure the academic ability & physical fitness of disabled vets. #dis #4c17
  61. .@AJLucchesi explains the difficulties of studying disability historically b/c the term changes. Archives are a challenge #4c17 #a13
  62. .@AJLucchesi shares work in disability archives, how tracing change of terms over time is one way investigate #dis pre-histories #a13 #4C17
  63. College health programs in 1890-1930 were focused on social hygiene, coded term for positive eugenics. @AJLucchesi #4c17 #a13
  64. .@AJLucchesi: Storey's "social hygiene" based on positive eugenics model, breeding future leaders to "sell hygiene" to all #a13 #dis #4C17
  65. @AJLucchesi: Studying #dis histories is hard because language shifts, e.g., physical health > social hygiene > handicap > disability. #4c17
  66. AL examines the writings of Thomas Storey, who worked in the "department of hygiene," which was essentially the health center. #4c17 #a13
  67. AL: In 1915 or so, CUNY had a four-course hygiene requirement, which focused on students' physical abilities. #4c17 #a13
  68. AL: The gymnasium, though brand new, had rows of chairs, and the instructor of hygiene wore a white lab coat for class. #4c17 #a13
  69. .@AJLucchesi: 1913. CCNY buys into social hygiene. Literally. Gym and curricuium invest in new era of "student abilities" #a13 #dis #4C17
  70. in 1970, disabled students needed to have their app reviewed by health guidance board to gain admission to CUNY. :o @AJLucchesi #a13 #4c17
  71. AL: Aftershocks of this: admissions policies requiring health review to get in, & they could be rejected bc of health condition. #4c17 #a13
  72. AL: By placing an emphasis on students' abilities, the institution also created disability. How does that translate to us today? #4c17 #a13
  73. @AJLucchesi Where do our expansions of student ability leave room for disability? #dis #4c17
  74. #4C17 #a13 @AJLucchesi: Incredibly rich and provocative presentation on the deep history or "pre-history" of #dis at colleges.
  75. .@AJLucchesi: Storey's model implicitly erases disability by focusing on a new wave of physical ability #a13 #dis #4C17
  76. .@AJLucchesi: Where are our hygienic gymnasiums? Are they our writing classes? Our writing centers? #a13 #dis #4C17
  77. On capitalization from @AJLucchesi: Only lowercase use of "college" in school handbook used in text disclaiming discrimination. #a13 #4C17
  78. In all other uses, it was "The College"—institutional pride, except when begrudgingly adding legislated text. #4c17 #a13  https://twitter.com/chris_friend/status/842438219379572736 
  79. Neil Simpkins, University of Wisconsin-Madison, “Co-Opting Activism, Cultivating Conservatism”
  80. Next up, Neil Simpkins to talk about "From Ramps to Red Tape: The Barriers of Bureacracy in Student Accommodations. #4c17 #a13
  81. .@AJLucchesi asks us what spaces currently create disablement for college students: writing centers? admissions? etc? #4c17 #a13
  82. .@AJLucchesi: Storey's model implicitly erases disability by focusing on a new wave of physical ability #a13 #dis #4C17
  83. NS: How did a space of disability advocacy/activism become an engine of documenting disability? #4c17 #a13
  84. Neil Simpkins asks How did a space of disability advocacy become an engine of documenting disability #4C17 #a13
  85. @neilfsimpkins: How did a space of disability advocacy/activism become an engine of documenting disability? #dis #4c17
  86. .@neilfsimpkins looks to UWM's history, how did a space of disability activism become an engine of documenting disability? #4c17 #a13
  87. NS is deftly describing his slides, verbally describing all illustrations (including emphases) to be more accessible. #a13 #4c17
  88. .@neilfsimpkins: UW McBurney Resource Center began as a resource to students to support each other and celebrate #dis culture #a13 #4C17
  89. .@neilfsimpkins shares archival materials re: disability activism in 1980's that celebrated disability, ASL, difference at UWM #4c17 #a13
  90. NS points out that the university announced its accessibility resources for low-vision students, but did it in a difficult font. #a13 #4c17
  91. .@neilfsimpkins when info about campus access is presented in inaccessible format, university is merely performing accessibility #4c17 #a13
  92. DS invokes Sara Ahmed WRT accounting of disabled students--registration forms demanding self-disclosure, sigh. #4c17 #a13
  93. .@neilfsimpkins: 504 signals change at McBurney. Resources communicate more to legislative mandates than disabled people #dis #a13 #4C17
  94. .@neilfsimpkins notes shift in early 90's from allowing disabled students to self-identify to requiring medical documentation #4c17 #a13
  95. .@neilfsimpkins: Rise in costs to retrofit UW led to intense pressure for #dis documentation in 90s #a13 #4C17
  96. Jay Dolmage, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, “The DeVos Effect”
  97. Next up, Jay Dolmage: We have to understand how legal/structural systems have advanced, bc they're likely to be dismantled. :( #4c17 #a13
  98. JD: Vicious cycle--students w/ disabilities are less likely to progress in education, which puts them further into debt. #4c17 #a13
  99. .@JayDolmage: With Devos at the edu helm, what happens to #dis students who graduate with up to 60% more debt? #a13 #4C17
  100. JD: DeVos and her family has clear links to corporations that profit from the educational industrial complex #a13 #4c17
  101. JD: As the managerial class increases on college campuses, so does the adjunct class. #a13 #4c17
  102. From @JayDolmage: Students with disabilities graduate with 60% more debt than others. Gold mine for @BetsyDeVosED's for-profits #4c17 #a13
  103. .@JayDolmage describes consequences of "Devos effect," the privatization of higher ed, for disabled students. Spoiler: not good. #a13 #4c17
  104. JD: Institutions struggle to get funding to make college more accessible; it's going to get worse, given the political climate. #a13 #4c17
  105. .@JayDolmage: it has always been hard for schools to fund #dis programs, and it's only going to get worse #a13 #4C17
  106. JD: The rhetorical impact of these policy is that students with disabilities are told they don't belong at college. #a13 #4c17
  107. .@JayDolmage: message coming from this administration is rhetorical; "the idea is that segregation is best" #dis #a13 #4C17
  108. Bleak future for students w/ disabilities. Voucher programs don't help. The DoE's IDEA site vanished as @BetsyDeVosED arrived. #4c17 #a13
  109. .@JayDolmage: "school choice" for disabled students means segregation, at-cost student services. #4c17 #a13
  110. JD: Institutions are making students pay for disability services that they are legally entitled to receive. #a13 #4c17
  111. .@JayDolmage: lackluster disability services speed up school-to-prison pipeline, impacting black students disproportionately #4c17 #a13
  112. .@JayDolmage: It's a big issue that faculty and students can believe that "accommodations are an unfair advantage" #dis #a13 #4C17
  113. JD re: Devos's statement that HBCUs were champions of school choice--that wasn't a slip-up, "it was a promise." #4c17 #a13
  114. JD ends with a strong political statement: how many seats do Democrats need to take the House at the next election cycle? #a13 #4c17
  115. .@JayDolmage reminds us that WE NEED TO GET TO WORK in order to resist neoliberal forces and privatization in higher ed. #a13 #4c17
  116. .@JayDolmage sees @BetsyDeVosED's comment about HBCUs as not slip up but a promise: Segregate and underserve. #4c17 #a13
  117. .@JayDolmage: We need to keep these struggles in view, visible. Make some beautiful #dis noise! #a13 #4C17
  118. .@JayDolmage: Devos's slip up that HBCUs were "pioneers of school choice" isn't just misunderstanding; "it was a promise." #dis #a13 #4C17
  119. #A13 serves critical reminder that we must resist resist resist resist forces of neoliberalism, oppression in higher ed and policy #4c17
  120. .@JayDolmage: "We will continue to see an edu dpmt that confuses segregation with choice, champions rights while repealing them." #dis #4C17
  121. JD: Terrible carpet and air conditioning cost a lot of money, but institutions will shell out. Why not disability resources? #a13 #4c17
  122. .@JayDolmage mentions cost of terrible carpet, everyone looks down. Cost of air conditioning, everyone looks up. #dis #4C17
  123. A.28 "Modes for Mainstreaming Students with Disabilities: Addressing the Complexities of Access through Assistive Technologies and Tactics of Inclusion"

  124. This panel explores the complexities of access, inclusion, and methods in teaching traditional classes with “mainstreamed” students.
  125. #4C17 #a28 Modes for Mainstreaming Students with #Disabilities... happening at 10:30 in A105! Hope you join us!
  126. Excited for #4c17 #a28, modes for mainstreaming students with disabilities
  127. Margaret Moore, Fairfield University, “My Name Is Meg: How Augmentative and Assistive Communication Devices Have Given Me a Voice”
  128. Pamela Chisum, Miami University of Ohio, “My Name Is Meg: How Augmentative and Assistive Communication Devices Have Given Me a Voice”
  129. Victoria Anderson, New York University, “When Worlds Collide: Autism in the University Classroom”
  130. Charlotte Brammer, Samford University, “Leveraging Writing Center Tutors to Break (Invisible) Disability Barriers”
  131. Maggie Collins, Bowling Green State University, “Improving Writing Skills and Perceptions: Assistive Technology in the Writing Center”
  132. Meg, mainstreamed student w/cerebral palsy, calls out stereotypes of students w/disabilities that limit academic opportunities #4c17 #a28
  133. She knew she would be better off pursuing college ed, not sitting at home letting her considerable intelligence go to waste #4c17 #a28
  134. Supportive classmates, faculty, staff, parents, and assistive technology all integral for academic success #4c17 #a28
  135. But assistive tech malfunctions; computer glitches are disastrous, and wheelchair also sometimes breaks down #4C17 #a28
  136. Insurance resists upgrades because they are not "medically necessary" #4C17 #a28
  137. Folks still perceive some1 w/ cerebral palsy doesn't belong on campus. Frantic attempts 2 "help" interfere w/Meg's participation #4C17 #a28
  138. Meg has had to be a persistent, insistent advocate for herself throughout her education. #4c17 #a28
  139. Many students do not know that disability access is available for them, so that they can get real degrees. #4c17 #a28
  140. Language for working with students with disabilities opens doors but can also create barriers #4C17 #a28
  141. Classroom inclusion goes beyond mainstreaming by striving to ensure full participation w/peers #4C17 #a28
  142. The university environment is designed for neurotypical people. #4c17 #a28
  143. Some students w/disabilities choose not to register with campus disability services for a variety of reasons #4c17 #a28
  144. We should design courses with accessibility in mind; don't have to wait for accommodation requests #4c17 #a28
  145. PBS website has videos about sensory overload that may be useful for classroom planning #4c17 #a28
  146. What do we do when we sense that students have an undiagnosed or undisclosed disability? Vocab of neurodiversity can help #4c17 #a28
  147. Can also include statement on learning styles, texts by people w/disabilities in syllabus, and practice accessibility design #4c17 #a28
  148. "assistive technology" is a marked term that emphasises disability, but this is shifting. #4c17 #a28
  149. Assistive tech=tools for improving access & individuals' productivity. #4c17 #a28
  150. Avoid "diagnosing;" ask students about comfort level w/material & suggest assistive tech based on writers' learning preference #4c17 #a28
  151. Learning & teaching how to use assistive tech takes time! This creates obstacles. #4c17 #a28
  152. Q about intersection of class, poverty, disability. Many students don't have access to diagnosis! #4c17 #a28
  153. Universal design enacts the principle of "show them the ramp." #4c17 #a28
  154. Assistive tech needs to be made free for all students #4c17 #a28
  155. Meg gives us a view of her composing process & assistive tech as she writes responses to ?s. VGA cable slows computer down. #4c17 #a28 https://t.co/voCVl8pIIC
    Meg gives us a view of her composing process & assistive tech as she writes responses to ?s. VGA cable slows computer down. #4c17 #a28 pic.twitter.com/voCVl8pIIC
  156. This process of composing is very time consuming; many more steps are involved #4c17 #a28 pic.twitter.com/LIBGeteAXP
  157. B.47 "Past the Law: Moving from Legal to Just in Disability Accommodations"

  158. Questioning ableist discourses of accommodations via new rhetoric that focuses on advocacy over obligation.
  159. Rhea Kennedy, Gallaudet University, “A Heightened Sense of Justice: Leaps toward Universal Design in Multimedia Communications”
  160. Up first at #b47, Rhea Kennedy with "A Hightened Sense of Justice?" #dis #4C17
  161. Rhea Kennedy draws attention to not-so-accessible modes of accessibility, e.g., YouTube closed captions. #dis #4c17
  162. Rhea Kennedy shares Gallaudet student video "A Hero's Hand" #dis #b47 #4C17
  163. Kennedy, heightened attention to accessibility in videos: headings & labels, text alternatives, captions, contrast/visual ease. #dis #4c17
  164. Kennedy: culture of media accessibility requires inclusive attitude, self-advocates, ad hoc (vs. universal) practices, resources. #dis #4c17
  165. .@RheaYKennedy A "biocultural" explanation for multimedia accessibility practices at Gallaudet #4c17 #b47 #disrhet
  166. Sushil Oswal, University of Washington, “Institutional Policies, Advocacy, and Academic Needs: Accommodational Rhetoric Intersecting Disability Support Services, Faculty, and Students with Disabilities”
  167. Sushil Oswal shares engagements with space and students as a blind professor #dis #b47 #4C17
  168. Oswal retells experience of being grabbed and told to stop from entering his own class. #dis #b47 #4C17
  169. Sushil Oswal discusses access conflicts when students' accommodations/access needs conflict with teachers' needs. #b47 #dis #4c17
  170. Oswal shares importance for orchestrating access needs and issues with access clashes in setting the tone of a class. #dis #b47 #4C17
  171. We often argue for meeting students' needs without going through disability services, but access issues can arise from this. #dis #4c17
  172. Oswal speaks #dis documentation, situation of faculty who are told by disability services "take the high road" for their access #b47 #4C17
  173. Tonya Stremlau, Gallaudet University, “Unringing the (A.G.) Bell: Deaf Community Advocacy for Language Access”
  174. Tonya Stremlau: What does access for deaf people mean? Legal req's don't often account for the preferences/needs of deaf people. #dis #4c17
  175. Tonya Stermlau discusses the #WhyISign hashtag and Deaf narratives of using sign language #b47 #4c17 #disrhet
  176. .@TonyaStremlau: both captions and sign are important pieces of Deaf access #dis #b47 #4C17
  177. Stremlau: The #WhyISign movement advocates that access to a native sign language is a fundamental human right for Deaf people. #dis #4c17
  178. .@TonyaStremlau now shares some Deaf history: 1880 Milan conference, Graham Bell and rise of oralism #dis #b47 #4C17
  179. Stermlau: Deaf community has its own credentialed experts, and social media advocacy posts cite their research studies #b47 #4c17 #disrhet
  180. Stremlau: Research shows that use of ASL with cochlear implants results in better speaking skill than cochlear implants alone. #dis #4c17
  181. Stermlau: Deaf activists shift the frame from audism to the importance of language access for all #b47 #4c17 #disrhet
  182. .@TonyaStremlau: language access comes in many modalities; individuals should have a right to language in their preference #dis #b47 #4C17
  183. Stremalu: Language comes in multiple modalities. All people should have access to language they can understand. #dis #4c17
  184. C.01 "Acknowledging and Facilitating Invisible Disabilities in the Classroom and Community"

  185. Focusing on learning disabilities, affective and sensory conditions, and autism, this Cultivate session will foster awareness of neurodiversity in the classroom and will cultivate community around accessibility options for students with invisible disabilities. The goal of this interactive session is for everyone to gain increased openness toward others they might have previously misunderstood and become conscious of their own position within a varied cognitive landscape. Participants will leave with tools and insights to create more equitable conditions for learning. Additionally, during the session, we will work together to produce a list of possible practice/policy changes, areas for further study, and resources to share; this list will be continuously updated and made available to all, even those not in attendance.
  186. The goal of #c01 is to help writing instructors better understand neurodiversity, invisible disabilities, & our own experiences. #dis #4c17
  187. Talking about disabilities from different perspectives and considering the various facets of disability as human experience #c01 #4c17
  188. Facilitators: Ellen Birdwell (Alvin Community College), Natalie Marin (Texas Woman's University), Madaline Walter (Benedictine College)
  189. Ellen Birdwell distinguishes between pathology & neurodiversity paradigm. Neurodiversity is an important part of diversity. #dis #4c17
  190. People in this session are sharing their experiences of reading. There are lots of ways for this to be! #4c17 #c01
  191. Ellen Birdwell offers tools to "put language on your own experience" When reading, is your experience visual, aural?#c01 #4c17
  192. Natalie Malin: Millions of Americans have invisible disabilities, so we need to develop invisible disability etiquette. #dis #4c17
  193. There's a lot of pressure on students with invisible disabilities not to disclose, to be "normal" #4c17 #c01
  194. If you have good resources for students w/invisible disabilities on your campus, add links to Blackboard #4c17 #c01
  195. Malin (citing Wendy Chrisman): psychiatric & emotional disabilities are underrepresented in disability studies. #dis #4c17
  196. Overall great ideas and strategies, but we need a two-way discussion between writing and disability centers, not just a syll line #4c17 #c01
  197. Disclosing invisible disabilities as an instructor carries risk, creates emotional labor (but may make students feel safer) #4c17 #c01
  198. "The legal and policy approach to disability makes us feel like there are pragmatic tools and there kind of aren't" #4C17 #C01
  199. C. 41 "Rhetorics of Disability: Cultivating Change across Discourse Communities and Developing Connections for Receptivity"

  200. This panel explores disability rhetorics in popular and academic cultural arenas to bring awareness of representation and inclusivity.
  201. Kristeen Cherney, Georgia State University, “Cultivating Digital Inclusion: Assessing the Challenges of Digital Classroom Texts and Inclusivity on the Web”
  202. #c41 #4C17 Cherney: An aesthetically pleasing website ≠ practical or accessible #dis
  203. Cherney: retrofits and multimodal inhospitality demonstrate how designers center normative bodyminds #4C17 #dis #c41
  204. Cherney: discusses access needs surveys as a way to cultivate multimodal pedagogy that is responsive & participatory #4C17 #c41 #dis
  205. Cherney: We can't assume our students want to use digital tech for class. #c41 #4C17
  206. Cherney: multimodal ≠ always digital; print too can be multimodal; print can provide just as it can impede access #4C17 #C41 #dis
  207. Cherney: Even web accessibility guidelines can be ableist; some W3C guides adopt a pathology paradigm; language matters #4C17 #C41 #dis
  208. Cherney: How are institutional pressures shaping our use of course websites and creation of digital assignments? #4C17 #c41
  209. Kat Weigle, University of Texas at San Antonio, “Marking the Invisible:Self-Stigmatization and Combatting Rhetorical Disability”
  210. Weigel: Examining the Semicolon Project as a rhetorical project. #c41 #4C17
  211. Weigle: Project Semicolon = visual marker to signal support and membership around neurodivergence; form of public address #4C17 #C41 #dis
  212. Weigle: rhetorical disability = visibility of stigma, where stigma means literally to prick or mark #4C17 #C41 #dis
  213. Weigle: Mental disability is stigmatized as among most frightening of disabilities bc of its supposed non-apparentness #4C17 #C41 #dis
  214. Weigle: "Functioning" rhetoric really means "how much do you pass / how much can I ignore you" #4C17 #C41 #dis
  215. Weigle: DSM diagnosis confers visibility, but that visibility often has a silencing effect #4C17 #C41 #dis
  216. Weigle: Psychiatric disability is an ethos problem–if you disclose, you lose ethos. Reminds me of E.Brewer's smart work! #C41 #4C17
  217. Weigle: Families (aka guardianship) wield more agency; rhetorical disability = we don't believe neurodivergent ppl #4C17 #C41 #dis
  218. Weigle: doctors & families can make decisions w/out consent of neurodivergent adults -> presumption of incompetence #4C17 #C41 #dis
  219. Weigle: Anguish on part of neurodivergent ppl = rarely met w/the assistance that they want & need; ND anguish = NT treatment #4C17 #c41 #dis
  220. Weigle: Why aren't we talking about "functioning" in relation to stigma and oppression? #4C17 #C41 #dis
  221. Weigle: semicolon tattoos can be a form of coming out, but coming out has risks #4C17 #C41 #dis
  222. Weigle: Rhetorical disability is also having to convince people that you have a disability. #4C17 #C41
  223. Weigle: rhetorical disability = "Depression makes you untrustworthy" but also "I don't believe that you're really depressed" #4C17 #C41 #dis
  224. D.20 “Composing Activist Spaces: The Spatial Rhetorics of Civil, Disability, and Men’s Rights Movements”

  225. This panel investigates how activists compose new meanings of space to argue for inclusion, rights, and justice.
  226. Now, we are talking about the activist spatial rhetorics of civil rights, disability activism, and men's rights movements! #d20 #4c17
  227. Here we go! #4c17 Composing Activist Spaces: The Spatial Rhetorics of Civil, Disability, and Men's Rights Movements! #D20
  228. Ruth Osorio (University of Maryland-College Park)
  229. @rorhetorician with second paper of #4c17 #D20—Disabling Space: Inventing a Disability-Positive Citizenship at the 504 Sit-Ins
  230. @rorhetorician talks ab emodied spatial rhetoric during the 1977 504 sit-ins: a 28 day protest outside and inside a govt office #4c17 #d20 https://t.co/Qd0BQnaKzi
    @rorhetorician talks ab emodied spatial rhetoric during the 1977 504 sit-ins: a 28 day protest outside and inside a govt office #4c17 #d20 pic.twitter.com/Qd0BQnaKzi
  231. "Through embodied / spatial rhetorics, 504 activists composed alternative, radical frameworks for citizenship"—@rorhetorician #4c17 #D20
  232. "Importantly, these frameworks for citizenship celebrated disability as opposed to excluding it." —@rorhetorician #4c17 #D20
  233. #4C17 #D20 through embodied/spatial rhetorics, 504 activists composed alternative, radical framework for citizenship
  234. 504 protests disrupted dominant ideas of which bodies belong in civic space and which ones don't—@rorhetorician #4c17 #D20
  235. #4C17 #D20 instead of excluding dis, celebrated it. Transformed office into living space. (1977)
  236. THOSE bodies in THIS space disrupted t dominant perceptions of what bodies belong in public & what in civic life -@rorhetorician #4c17 #d20
  237. @rorhetorician incisively connects disability, citizenship, religion, and sex, all in context of redefining public spaces. #4c17 #D20
  238. #4c17 #D20 protestors remade space of elevator to suit their needs as disabled citizens- rest, sex, religion/revised meaning of citizenship
  239. In #d20, @rorhetorician discusses the Section 504 protests in SF, 1977. Fascinating 25-day sit in that redefined a Fed space & values. #4c17
  240. F.46 "How Captioning Cultivates Change"

  241. The compositional and rhetorical processes of captioning as dual acts of access and aesthetics, form and content, style and substance.
  242. Brenda Brueggemann (University of Connecticut), Janine Butler (East Carolina University), Chad Iwertz (The Ohio State University)
  243. Janine Butler: Deaf Gain influences productive use of technologies. #f46 #4c17
  244. G.10 "Translating Inclusivity in Technical Communication"

  245. Panelists explore possibilities for design practices that foster inclusivity.
  246. Natasha Jones & Stephanie Wheeler, University of Central Florida, “Cultivating Capacity, Creating Change: Disability, Design, and Inclusion”
  247. H.05 "More Than Writing through It: Self-Care, Disability, and Rhetorical Practice"

  248. This panel approaches care from a rhetorical disability studies perspective to challenge the normative nature of writing practices.
  249. Elizabeth Brewer, Central Connecticut State University,New Britain, “Boss Compositionists, Plate Twirlers, and Figurehead Monarchs: Interdependent Care and the Hyper-Individualized WPA”
  250. First up at #h5, Elizabeth Brewer with "Boss Compositionists, Plate Twirlers, and Figurehead Monarchs" #dis #4C17
  251. Elizabeth Brewer critiques self-care as being depicted as a personal issue rather than professional #4C17 #h05
  252. Brewer: current WPA scholarship situate self-care as retrofit that puts the onus on the individual #h5 #dis #4C17
  253. Brewer: we need to conceptualize "interdependent WPA self-care" #h5 #dis #4C17
  254. Brewer argues that self-care is interdependent with our professional work. However self-care is often seen as a retrofit #4c17 #h05
  255. Brewer: "Continuing to position self-care as a retrofit perpetuates the image of hyper-individualized, hyper-abled WPA" #h5 #dis #4C17
  256. Brewer: "Are there places we already practice interdependent self-care and don't name it as such?" #h5 #dis #4C17
  257. Allison Hitt, University of Central Arkansas, “‘At Least I’m Not Insane’: Practicing Radical Self-Care in the Writing Classroom”
  258. Next up at #h5 is @ahhitt with "'At Least I'm Not Insane': Practicing Radical Self-Care in the Writing Classroom" #dis #4C17
  259. #4c17 #h05 @ahhitt: Spaces of literacy instruction are ideal for radical self-care because we have the tools to discuss, critique, disrupt.
  260. Hitt: Mental illness is seen as something that doesn't belong in the academy. #h05 #4C17
  261. .@ahhitt: "there is a crucial need to self-care, particularly for vulnerable student populations" #h5 #dis #4C17
  262. Risk of not addressing self-care: students/instructors who disappear,or whose disclosures "bubble out at the seams" @ahhitt #4c17 #h05
  263. .@ahhitt shares self-care plan used in classes and generated with students to keep self-care in focus #h5 #dis #4C17 https://t.co/STHp1q5VHd
    .@ahhitt shares self-care plan used in classes and generated with students to keep self-care in focus #h5 #dis #4C17 pic.twitter.com/STHp1q5VHd
  264. #h05 #4c17 @ahhitt qts. student: "The problem with all of my mind, body, & spirit goals is that they clash with my academic goals"
  265. Hitt is drawing on decomposition theory to point out how self care can disrupt the neoliberal bent of the academy. #4c17 #h05 @ahhitt
  266. .@ahhitt: "self-care both disrupts and perpetuates neoliberal values" #h5 #dis #4C17
  267. But self care can also be coopted in ways that support neoliberal ideals of productivity and efficiency. #h05 #4C17
  268. Reciprocal disclosures: culture of interdependent give (care) and take (care) @ahhitt #4c17 #h05
  269. Hitt: Disclosure is dangerous, especially in systems that view disability as a disqualifier. #4C17 #h05
  270. #h05 #4c17: radical self-care in writing classroom as space to understand ways of learning, writing, being @ahhitt https://t.co/oyNKNpiDuy
    #h05 #4c17: radical self-care in writing classroom as space to understand ways of learning, writing, being @ahhitt pic.twitter.com/oyNKNpiDuy
  271. Amy Vidali, University of Colorado Denver, “Dear Disability: Humor,Self-Care, and Recommendation Letters”
  272. Vidali: Critiques of Millennials are largely false, but a devotion to positivity is troubling. #4C17 #h05
  273. Vidali: How can negativity and engaging with failure/ disappointment be an important part of self care? #4C17 #h05
  274. @amyvidali: embracing failure and disappointment is a radical act of self-care #dis #h5 #4C17
  275. Vidali: Failure can be the best choice, and embracing it can be an act of self care. #4C17 #h05
  276. @amyvidali: "How can't I use self-care to help me through this project, instead of keeping me from it?" #dis #h5 #4C17
  277. Vidali: Self care and coping are different. Coping is individual, self care takes a community. #4C17 #h05
  278. @amyvidali: "I want to carry and care myself not through traumatic spaces, but in them." ❤️ #dis #h5 #4C17
  279. Addressing self-care in teaching and students' learning is radical, political, and necessary. #H05 #4C17 @NCTE_CCCC @ahhitt
  280. Dale Katherine Ireland, The Graduate Center, CUNY
  281. @dalekatherine now responds asynchronously in #h5, speaks to issues of #dis documentation, pain, and access #4C17
  282. Ireland's response to #h05 points out how asynchronous self care responds to institutional pressure and is a kind of retrofit. #4C17
  283. @dalekatherine speaks to asynchronous self-care, acknowledges moments when self-care is deferred in moments of pain #h5 #dis #4C17
  284. Q&A
  285. Good ? about how you bring discussions about interdependence, connectedness into professional space - teaching philosophies, etc. #4c17 #h05
  286. Practice radical self care we must. Hostility to disability fr m the dark side comes. #4c17 #h05 #academicyoda https://t.co/UaIwSLVsBZ
    Practice radical self care we must. Hostility to disability fr m the dark side comes. #4c17 #h05 #academicyoda pic.twitter.com/UaIwSLVsBZ
  287. Brewer wraps up session by pointing out that self care isn't easy or just individual–there needs to be a culture of it. #4C17 #h05
  288. H.50 “Cripping” the Writing Program: Disability and Policy beyond the Ableist Script

  289. Panel critically examines policy documents, specifically the syllabus, as a means to move beyond the ableist script.
  290. Leslie Anglesey, University of Nevada, Reno, “‘Cripping’ the Writing Classroom: Out of the Closet and Technology Policies in the Writing Classroom”
  291. Anglesey offers insights into syllabus design, accessibility, and the ways technology policies position disabled students #4c17 #H50 #dis
  292. Anglesey, drawing on Bawarshi: the syllabus is powerful because it's an occluded genre #4c17 #H50
  293. Citing Bawarshi, @sassysojourner argues the syllabus is a powerful genre that puts students in particular subjectivities #h50 #4c17 #dis
  294. Anglesey: What value do technology bans serve for our students, particularly with disproportionate impact on disabled students #4c17 #H50
  295. Students must either ask for an accommodation that supersedes syllabus or choose to “pass” and not disclose their disability #h50 #4c17 #dis
  296. Anglesey: what does it mean for students to be present in kairotic spaces? #4c17 #H50
  297. @sassysojourner What work do prohibitive tech statements do in syllabi have if most writing teachers view tech as beneficial? #h50 #4c17
  298. the model of presence in kairotic spaces frequently forecloses use of technology, potentially outing disabled students #H50 #4c17
  299. Anglesey: Using tech in class when teachers prohibits it can "out" disabled students who need the accommodation #h50 #4c17 #dis
  300. Leslie Angelson's presentation on ableism in the syllabus has me seriously reconsidering the language in my tech policy. #4c17 #h50
  301. In the syllabus, my tech policy probably relies on ableist language. Need to match that policy with my real practice. #4c17 #h50
  302. Also, let me point out the irony of tweeting/using tech during a presentation, when so many of our policies would ban that. #4c17 #h50
  303. Also, my apologies to Leslie Anglesey - my tablet "auto corrected" her name in an earlier tweet :/ #4c17 #h50
  304. I appreciate a session that invites me to be better #H50. I need to inspect my classroom participation as "social network" metaphor. #4c17  https://twitter.com/aspatriarca/status/842804595428487168 
  305. Melissa Nicolas, University of Nevada, “‘Cripping’ the Writing Program:Program Policy Statements and the ‘Normal’ Student”
  306. Melissa Nicolas: Writing program policies make certain needs, bodies, or behaviors exceptional #h50 #4c17 #dis
  307. Melissa Nicolas suggests ways to have Ss be in class w/out being physically present: Skype, moderating discussion boards, etc. #4c17 #h50
  308. Catherine Prendergast, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,“‘Cripping’ the Writing Classroom: Ableism and the Attendance Policy”
  309. Prendergast: when working with students with invisible disabilities, sometimes our best tactic is to ask "what do you need?" #4c17 #H50
  310. Prendergast, citing Kerschbaum, notes that disability disclosure is a process that develops over the semester #4c17 #H50
  311. requiring a letter from the doctor may mean forcing students to disclose their disability against their will #4c17 #H50
  312. Prendergast has cripped her attendance policy by throwing it away #4c17 #H50
  313. .@cjprender: attendance policies fail to account for the ways illnesses might actually operate. #4c17 #h50
  314. @cjprender: requiring doctor's notes for excused absences likely forces disclosure on the student. #4c17 #h50
  315. Q&A
  316. Q&A: defining "participation," "distraction," and "presence" is a power play #4c17 #H50
  317. Although they may be fraught for some students, attendance policies can promote student retention #4c17 #h50
  318. Q&A: How do we revise or resist legally-mandated syllabus boilerplate? #H50 #4c17
  319. K.52 "The Nonrational/Nonspeaking Subject: A Disability Studies Analysis through Narrative, Qualitative Research, and Philosophical Inquiry"

  320. We investigate the rhetoricity and materiality of “the human” if the subject does not speak, has dementia, loses memory, or is indentured.
  321. Elisabeth Miller, University of Wisconsin-Madison, “Aphasia and the Need to Establish Rhetoricity”
  322. Miller critiques Isocrates' praise of speech as mark of humanness & "most employed by those who posses intelligence" #k52 #dis #4C17
  323. E Miller uses Gabby Griffords to discuss rhetoricity and aphasia #4C17 #k52
  324. Miller critiques formation of Gifford as supercrip in presented "expert testimony" #k52 #dis #4C17
  325. Miller looks to Gabby Giffords memoir to explore rhetoricity/rhetorical disability/rhetoricability #k52 #dis #4C17
  326. Miller: "disability insists that we understand rhetoricity, rhetoric, and communication not as standard or given" #k52 #dis #4C17
  327. Sidney Jones, The Ohio State University, “Breaking the Black Female Body Down: Our Nig and Articulating Disability”
  328. Sidney Jones connects disability to the larger narrative of slavery #4c17 #k52
  329. Jones looks to intersections of disability and pain to read slave narrative of Wilson's _Our Nig_ #k52 #dis #4C17
  330. Jones: pain and impairment are emblematic of racial and class inequality #k52 #dis #4C17
  331. Jones: Whiteness becomes synonymous with the absence of pain in _Our Nig_ #k52 #dis #4C17
  332. Sidney Jones: The black body is constructed as both defective and a super-body, each marking otherness and exceptionalism #k52 #4c17 #dis
  333. Jones critiques the "superbody," theory that black bodies are built to endure more pain than white bodies #k52 #dis #4C17
  334. Hailee Gibbons, University of Illinois at Chicago, “Using ‘Demented Time’ to Cultivate Access and Relationships with People with Mental Disabilities”
  335. Hailee Yoshizaki Gibbons advocates for work on dementia through her theory of "demented time" #4C17 #k52
  336. Gibbons "demented time involves focusing on a particular moment in time and place and remaining flexible as moments pass" #4C17 #k52
  337. .@HaileeMGibbons builds on Kafer's crip time to conecptualize time with dementia, or "demented time" #k52 #dis #4C17
  338. Gibbson settled on demented time to frame it as an extension of crip time #4C17 #k52
  339. Gibbons demented time "can acknowledge that the important aspect of interaction is the connection being built" between 2 ppl #4c17 #k52
  340. .@HaileeMGibbons: demented time is umbrella term: mad, insane, driven 2 behave irrationally due to anger, distress, or excitement #dis #4C17
  341. .@HaileeMGibbons: in demented time interaction is meaningful, inclusive, affirmative connection between oneself and others #k52 #dis #4C17
  342. Margaret Price, The Ohio State University, “‘Are They Still in There?’: A Qualitative and Material Analysis of Memory Loss and the In/human”
  343. .@PriceMargaret: "memory is entangled with our notions of what it means to be human" #k52 #dis #4C17
  344. @PriceMargaret looks at the way memory is entangled with emotion and memory is entangled with what it means to be human #4c17 #k52
  345. .@PriceMargaret: Memory is entangled with our notions of what it means to be human, and beyond that, a valuable human #k52 #4c17 #dis
  346. .@PriceMargaret: when disability is centered, spacetime becomes something radically different—not in degree, but in kind #k52 #4c17 #dis
  347. @PriceMargaret obscure disabilities are those that are difficult to recognize, name, map (Harnish) #k52 #4c17
  348. .@PriceMargaret points to unpredictability in spacetime and "unaccomodatable disabilities" #k52 #dis #4C17
  349. .@PriceMargaret: "I have begun telling my students that disability is a metric and not a condition." #k52 #dis #4C17
  350. .@PriceMargaret considers ways "accommodation itself operates as a mechanism of neoliberalism." #k52 #dis #4C17
  351. Questions?


    Please let me know if you have any questions, comments, or stories that you would like to add (or would like me to remove). You can contact me at allison.hitt@gmail.com

    Thanks for a great conference, everyone!