Afternoon Shift: Aphasia, Apache math and MacArthur fellow Tarell Alvin McCraney

Aphasia is a potentially devastating yet surprisingly common disorder that can affect a person's ability to talk, read, write and understand spoken language. At age 32, playwright and Steppenwolf ensemble member, Tarell Alvin McCraney, received a 2013 MacArthur genius grant to support his work.

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  1. Learning about aphasia 


    Aphasia is a potentially devastating yet surprisingly common disorder that can affect a person's ability to talk, read, write and understand spoken language. Most people don't know about this communication disorder that affects more people than Parkinson's disease: one million Americans, or 1 in 250 people, including adults and children. Northwestern University is on the forefront of combating this illness and supporting survivors and their families. 


    Joining us are: Doctor Cynthia Thompson who is a professor of Communication Sciences in the Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology at Northwestern University, Belma Hadziselimovic who is a speech-language pathologist on the clinical faculty in the Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Communication Sciences and Disorders department at Northwestern University and Carolyn Goffman, senior instructor in English Literature at DePaul University and spouse of Dan Goffman, who has Aphasia resulting from a stroke in January 2006.

  2. Professor of Communication Sciences Doctor Cynthia Thompson and Speech-language pathologist Belma Hadziselimovic join #afternoonshift unpacking the "mental prison" or the language disorder aphasia
  3. Teaching Math through Apache cultural lense

    As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian welcomes Philip Stevens to speak on Apache math looking at one of the many ways that the different cultural perspective can provide new solutions to today’s problems. Mathematics touches everyone’s lives whether balancing your personal budget or understanding the forces driving the global financial markets or sending a man to Mars. Improving each student's abilities in mathematics in the classroom is on the mind of many parents, teachers and administrators. This is a new approach that can make positive improvements, not just for Apache students but can be applied to every student. Kathleen McDonald, executive director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston also joins us. 
  4. Project 365 #310: 061113 No Pressure Then
  5. Tarell Alvin McCraney, MacArthur genius grant recipient 


    At age 32, playwright and Steppenwolf ensemble member, Tarell Alvin McCraney, received a 2013 MacArthur genius grant to support his work in exploring “the rich diversity of the African American experience.”  How might this honor change the course and trajectory of his craft? We talk with Tarell about his past and future work.

  6. Trailer | Antony and Cleopatra | Royal Shakespeare Company
  7. Weather, news and sports
  8. Northern Illinois University meteorologist Gilbert Sebenste gives us the forecast.
  9. WBEZ reporter Susie Ann joins us to talk about Tribune Co's recent restructuring of business and employees.
  10. It has not been an easy week for the Washington, Illinois High School Football team. The Panthers beat Normal University High School last Saturday to advance to this weekends semifinals, but on Sunday, devastating tornadoes ripped through the town of Washington, leaving several players and one assistant coach without homes.


    Charlie Schlenker of NPR member station WGLT in Bloomington-Normal went to the teams first practice since the storm yesterday at Illinois State University’s Hancock Stadium. We hear his report, and then we're joined by WBEZ producer Becky Vevea who talked to Coach Darrell Crouch this morning.

  11. Gay marriage bill signing

    Today Governor Pat Quinn is currently at the UIC Forum on Chicago’s near West Side with lawmakers and leaders in the LGBT community signing the bill into the law. Our own Al Keefe is at the signing.


    What happens now? Well, the law won’t go into effect for a couple months. But law or no law, opponents of gay marriage are still standing strong, especially in the African-American community. Some ministers, not all, but some ministers continue to rail against the decision in Springfield. Where do they go from here? WBEZ’s Ken Davis has more on that story.
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