Start up to Scale up: Global Innovations for Children and Youth Summit [Day 2]

The first Global Innovations for Children and Youth Summit, hosted by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland & UNICEF asks: 1) how do we get important products to a billion people and 2) which opportunities from tech/private sector will have the biggest impact on children in the next 5 years.

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  1. 10 November 2015
  2. View the summary of day 1 here
  3. Following a fantastic and thought-provoking first day, the second day of the Innovation Summit kicked off with discussions about perspective, storytelling, narratives and youth!
  4. After some statements and exercises to get the minds thinking a keynote by His Highness Prince Fahad Al Saud, NA3M Founder & CEO, we delved into issues of how we tell stories (about people, innovation and our rapidly changing world).
  5. His Highness Prince Fahad Al Saud
    His Highness Prince Fahad Al Saud
  6. After the keynote, a very lively panel discussion captured the attention of every one in the room, featuring: Craig Hatkoff, Co-Founder, Tribeca Film Festival; His Highness Prince Fahad Al Saud, NA3M Founder & CEO; Georgia Arnold, Senior Vice President, Social Responsibility,
    Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN) / Executive Director, MTV Staying Alive Foundation; M.anifest, Artist; Funa Maduka, Content Strategist; Nanjala Nyabola, Writer; Abiola Oke, CEO, Okayafrica; and Sami Sheikh, Actor
  7. Panelists were tasked with giving their views on who tells the story; why the story is told; how we tell the story and how we scale the story.
  8. But first there was this epic selfie...
  9. Our panel on Creating The Narrative of The Future at UNICEF's Global Innovations For Children & Youth Summit was really inspiring, complete with brilliant minds, honesty, a bit of controversy and more, but first I figured, let's take a Selfie!!! But on a serious note, when I think of UNICEF + Panel, I think of a room filled with a bunch of boring, entitled bureaucrats who gather on a stage to enjoy the sweet sounds of their own voices, one ego stroking chord progression of sound bites at a time. Typically this melody of collective back patting is never followed up with any discernible or actionable goals; this is not to say discussion has no value, but the focus of the summit was to scale ideas into reality reaching a billion people, this was different. Perhaps it was the sheer diversity of the speakers, and not racial or ethnic diversity either, although two Nigerians, two Arabs, a Ghanaian, a Kenyan, one white Brit and one white American is a pretty diverse group in itself, but more so presenting a diverse set of experiences, work, knowledge and ambitions. The sheer honesty of the group was a surprise for much of the audience, half of which you see here. The panel led off with question of what, why, who and how our stories are told. We challenged the audience to be honest about white privilege, the dangers of a single story, the unfair and unbalanced coverage of African stories, Cecil the Lion (don't get me started, sorry Craig), changing systems from within, poverty porn, stereotypes and so much more. For once I saw the value in twitter, considering that I've never been retweeted so many times. What I think is most important in all of this is that, as much as we continue to challenge current platforms in telling accurate and "diverse," stories, we have to continue to own our own narrative and tell our own stories in as compelling and nuanced as we'd like to see others portray us. There's so much more work to get done and many of us are committed to it and the take aways from this panel will be realized. Thank you UNICEF for this opportunity. #Uinnovate #Unicef
    Our panel on Creating The Narrative of The Future at UNICEF's Global Innovations For Children & Youth Summit was really inspiring, complete with brilliant minds, honesty, a bit of controversy and more, but first I figured, let's take a Selfie!!! But on a serious note, when I think of UNICEF + Panel, I think of a room filled with a bunch of boring, entitled bureaucrats who gather on a stage to enjoy the sweet sounds of their own voices, one ego stroking chord progression of sound bites at a time. Typically this melody of collective back patting is never followed up with any discernible or actionable goals; this is not to say discussion has no value, but the focus of the summit was to scale ideas into reality reaching a billion people, this was different. Perhaps it was the sheer diversity of the speakers, and not racial or ethnic diversity either, although two Nigerians, two Arabs, a Ghanaian, a Kenyan, one white Brit and one white American is a pretty diverse group in itself, but more so presenting a diverse set of experiences, work, knowledge and ambitions. The sheer honesty of the group was a surprise for much of the audience, half of which you see here. The panel led off with question of what, why, who and how our stories are told. We challenged the audience to be honest about white privilege, the dangers of a single story, the unfair and unbalanced coverage of African stories, Cecil the Lion (don't get me started, sorry Craig), changing systems from within, poverty porn, stereotypes and so much more. For once I saw the value in twitter, considering that I've never been retweeted so many times. What I think is most important in all of this is that, as much as we continue to challenge current platforms in telling accurate and "diverse," stories, we have to continue to own our own narrative and tell our own stories in as compelling and nuanced as we'd like to see others portray us. There's so much more work to get done and many of us are committed to it and the take aways from this panel will be realized. Thank you UNICEF for this opportunity. #Uinnovate #Unicef
  10. Some of the highlights included: 1) the danger of single stories; 2) that stories must be told by those who live the experiences; 3) that we need diverse voices and stories; 4) that we need to check our own privilege.
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