Guatemala Children in Crisis

Political instability and poverty-induced malnutrition can't stop Stanford researchers from fighting child mortality. #StanfordCIC

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  1. "The death of any child is always a tragedy, but the death of any child from preventable causes is always unjust." - Paul Wise
  2. Stanford Health Policy's Paul Wise takes us to San Lucas Tolimán, Guatemala. Using a team of local health promoters, Dr. Wise's Guatemala Child Nutrition Program has drastically reduced child deaths in the area. A component of Children in Crisis, this program targets children under 5 in rural communities around San Lucas and monitors their growth to save the most malnourished and make sure sick children get the help they need.
  3. Guatemala Children in Crisis Sneak Peak
  4. Customs, clothes and colors change, but no matter where I go in the world, children are the same: rambunctious, curious, playful and ultimately innocent.
  5. Most indigenous children living in rural Guatemala are malnourished to some degree. In the communities it serves, the health promoter program has decreased severe malnutrition among children under 5 by more than 60%, but more work is needed. Other communities queue to join the program and many children currently served are still moderately malnourished.
  6. Stanford's Children in Crisis program continues to look for new ways to better serve the nutrition program and the health promoters who implement it. The program's new app helps the promoters to track nutrition faster, more accurately and with less training. Eventually, the Stanford team hopes to distribute the app to nutrition programs around the world to decrease child mortality on a global scale.
  7. The mothers who bring their children into the nutrition program care deeply about their health. They may not always be able to provide their children with the sustenance they need, but they strive to do the best they can and are grateful for a little help.
  8. This little guy is getting a head start on his promoter training.
  9. Stanford researcher Alejandro Chavez developed the nutrition app and now lives in San Lucas to better train the promoters using the app and to ensure that it fits the needs of the communities using it.
  10. During Semana Santa, Guatemalans make alfombras, carpets of flowers, fruit and sawdust, that fill the streets. Processions March over the alfombras, and when they pass, the remnants are quickly swept away. #StanfordCIC
    During Semana Santa, Guatemalans make alfombras, carpets of flowers, fruit and sawdust, that fill the streets. Processions March over the alfombras, and when they pass, the remnants are quickly swept away. #StanfordCIC
  11. Good Friday is the height of Semana Santa in Guatemala. Today, the community comes together to construct alfombras, or carpets, out of flowers, sawdust, fruit, vegetables, pine needles and other natural materials. The main procession will follow the alfombras throughout the town.
  12. Everyone comes together to create these beautiful Mayan works of art.
  13. The children are particularly eager to help.
  14. Even the gringos lend a hand.
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