Homeopathy is a swearword on Twitter

How Holland & Barrett's Twitter campaign went horribly wrong. If they had researched Twitter trends first, they might have realised that there are quite a few vocal and active anti-quackery users keeping a watchful eye on the topic.

byNukapai831 Views
Favicon for https://storify.com
storify.com
805 views
Favicon for https://twitter.com
twitter.com
26 views
Embed

  1. It all started innocently enough...
  2. (Although whether one would be encouraged to buy medicine from anyone who talks about a "tummy" to anyone over 10 is another matter).
  3. Then Holland & Barrett started sending direct messages instead of replying to tweets as promised, but this was seen as an avoidance-technique by the audience. They also claimed they could fit more detail into a direct message response even though the text limit for a DMs is exactly the same as the one for normal tweets. And unless H&B were planning on following the tweeters back, direct messaging wouldn't be possible anyway...
  4. What should we learn from this? Well, first: social media is not a controlled announcement-based sales tool; it's not even a controlled conversation. You are gate-crashing into the world's largest pub and hoping that what you want to talk about engages your audience in the way you intended. For that to happen, you MUST do your research. (We didn't learn that homeophathy is quackery because we knew that already).
Like
Share

Share

Facebook
Google+