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One day in Yemen

An MSF UK doctor takes over Twitter and Instagram to show what it's like to live and work in Yemen, where an underreported and calamitous conflict is having deadly consequences for its people.

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  1. MSF doctor Natalie Roberts is taking over our Instagram and Twitter channels to show you what it's like to live and work in Yemen today. Natalie is an emergency doctor from the UK who has been working with MSF for two years.
  2. In that time she's spent nine months in Syria, where she helped to set up and run a hospital. She's also been to the Philippines twice, most recently running MSF's inflatable hospital in Tacloban, a city devastated by Typhoon Yolanda. She was in the Central African Republic for three months earlier this year and and then Gambella, Ethiopia.
  3. And now, Natalie has just returned from Yemen. Posting this day in the life proved too difficult to conduct in real time due to logistical challenges, which will become clear from the following posts. To find out more about Natalie, read her MSF blog:  blogs.msf.org/en/staff/authors/natalie-roberts 
  4. For all of tomorrow, MSF doctor Natalie Roberts will take over our Instagram channel to show you what it's like to live and work in Yemen today. Natalie is an emergency doctor from the UK who has been working with MSF for two years. In that time she's spent nine months in Syria, where she helped to set up and run a hospital. She's also been to the Philippines twice, most recently running MSF's inflatable hospital in Tacloban, a city devastated by Typhoon Yolanda. She was in the Central African Republic for three months earlier this year and and then Gambella, Ethiopia. And now, Natalie has just returned from Yemen. Posting this day in the life proved too difficult to conduct in real time due to logistical challenges, which will become clear from tomorrow's posts. We'll be sending more updates from Natalie throughout the day on our @msf_field Twitter page, which you can get to from the link in our bio. 
#Yemen #Amran2Saada #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #war #conflict #dayinthelife
    For all of tomorrow, MSF doctor Natalie Roberts will take over our Instagram channel to show you what it's like to live and work in Yemen today. Natalie is an emergency doctor from the UK who has been working with MSF for two years. In that time she's spent nine months in Syria, where she helped to set up and run a hospital. She's also been to the Philippines twice, most recently running MSF's inflatable hospital in Tacloban, a city devastated by Typhoon Yolanda. She was in the Central African Republic for three months earlier this year and and then Gambella, Ethiopia. And now, Natalie has just returned from Yemen. Posting this day in the life proved too difficult to conduct in real time due to logistical challenges, which will become clear from tomorrow's posts. We'll be sending more updates from Natalie throughout the day on our @msf_field Twitter page, which you can get to from the link in our bio. #Yemen #Amran2Saada #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #war #conflict #dayinthelife
  5. I'm doctor Natalie Roberts and I'm an MSF project coordinator in Yemen, a country experiencing one of the worst conflicts I have ever seen. Today, I'm trying to show what a typical day is like for our teams in there. For more info and photos, head over to our @msf_field Twitter page.

We're on the road for a long day today, moving from Amran to the Saada mountains. There was bombing yesterday in our destination, so everyone is anxious. Our car is full: there's my three Yemeni colleagues, we have medical supplies to deliver, plus food and a generator to make sure we can eat and have light tonight. We stop at a camp near an MSF-supported health centre. 1,000 people live here in awful conditions, they left Saada due to airstrikes. I’m sending this young child with acute malnutrition to the MSF emergency room. People complain here that they have no food.
#Amran2Saada #DoctorsWithoutBorders #MSF #Yemen #YemenCrisis #Malnutrition #War
Click the link in our bio for more from Natalie.
    I'm doctor Natalie Roberts and I'm an MSF project coordinator in Yemen, a country experiencing one of the worst conflicts I have ever seen. Today, I'm trying to show what a typical day is like for our teams in there. For more info and photos, head over to our @msf_field Twitter page. We're on the road for a long day today, moving from Amran to the Saada mountains. There was bombing yesterday in our destination, so everyone is anxious. Our car is full: there's my three Yemeni colleagues, we have medical supplies to deliver, plus food and a generator to make sure we can eat and have light tonight. We stop at a camp near an MSF-supported health centre. 1,000 people live here in awful conditions, they left Saada due to airstrikes. I’m sending this young child with acute malnutrition to the MSF emergency room. People complain here that they have no food. #Amran2Saada #DoctorsWithoutBorders #MSF #Yemen #YemenCrisis #Malnutrition #War Click the link in our bio for more from Natalie.
  6. From the displaced persons camp, we headed to our second stop of the day: an MSF-supported health centre. We set up a makeshift emergency room for people with paediatric and maternity complications. We've also had to rent minibuses to act as ambulances. Before, if people couldn't find someone willing to drive their loved ones to a hospital they would often have to go without medical care. 
It's dangerous being on the roads in Yemen, getting stuck behind cars makes everyone in the team worried as airstrikes can happen at any time. Thankfully, traffic wasn't bad today and we made it through OK, but the person driving this truck delivering apples wasn't as fortunate. 
#Amran2Saada #DoctorsWithoutBorders #MSF #Yemen #YemenCrisis #Malnutrition #War #airstrike
Follow the link in our bio for more from Natalie.
    From the displaced persons camp, we headed to our second stop of the day: an MSF-supported health centre. We set up a makeshift emergency room for people with paediatric and maternity complications. We've also had to rent minibuses to act as ambulances. Before, if people couldn't find someone willing to drive their loved ones to a hospital they would often have to go without medical care. It's dangerous being on the roads in Yemen, getting stuck behind cars makes everyone in the team worried as airstrikes can happen at any time. Thankfully, traffic wasn't bad today and we made it through OK, but the person driving this truck delivering apples wasn't as fortunate. #Amran2Saada #DoctorsWithoutBorders #MSF #Yemen #YemenCrisis #Malnutrition #War #airstrike Follow the link in our bio for more from Natalie.
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