Teaching Digital Citizenship for Non-Specialists (Grades 3-5)

Common Sense Media Lesson Plans on Digital Citizenship

Embed

  1. Elementary teachers understand the importance of digital citizenship in the lives of students. To be fully active members in participatory culture (Jenkins et al., 2005) today children from a young age need to be taught how to be safe, respectful, and responsible online. However, Hammer (2011) tells us that unfortunately teachers are not receiving adequate education and training on media literacy. In other words, non-specialist teachers need support to integrate digital citizenship into their classrooms.
  2. [Cover Photo Attribution: By zeitfaenger.at from Ansfelden, Austria ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 ), via Wikimedia Commons]
  3. Common Sense Media has developed a comprehensive and easy to use curriculum on digital citizenship for students from K to 12. This Storify focuses on 10 lesson plans designed for Grades 3 to 5 to introduce teachers to this outstanding resource. Link to the Common Sense Media Curriculum on Digital Citizenship at:  https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/digital-citizenship 
  4. WHAT IS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP?
  5. According to Common Sense Media (2016), digital citizenship is the ability to “think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world” (n.p.)
  6. WHY IS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP IMPORTANT?
  7. Videos included in the Common Sense Education curriculum introduce teachers to the new media landscape in easy to understand language suitable for those unfamiliar with the field of media literacy.
  8. WHY CHOOSE THE COMMON SENSE EDUCATION CURRICULUM ON DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP?
  9. THE CURRICULUM ON DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  10. ~Multimedia resources engage students. For example, through the use of text, lively music, and colourful images, the following short videos effectively communicate key concepts to elementary level students about staying safe online (Common Sense Education):
  11. LESSON PLAN COMPONENTS
  12. -Links to Common Core Standards
    -Lessons are framed with an Essential Question (McTighe & Wiggins, 2013)
    -Lesson Overview and Objectives
    -Materials and Preparation
    -Each lesson follows the format: Introduction, Teaching Points, and Closing
    -Blackline Masters

    -Assessment Tools with Teacher Answer Key
  13. References
  14. Hammer, R. (2011). Critical media literacy as engaged pedagogy. E-Learning and
    Digital Media, 8
    (4), 357-363.
  15. Jenkins, H., Puroshotma, R., Clinton, K., Weigel, M., & Robison, A. (2005). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
  16. Kavoori, A., & Matthews, D. (2004). Critical media pedagogy: The Thinking Television project. Howard Journal of Communication, 15, 99 – 114.
Like
Share

Share

Facebook
Google+