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  1. Climate change is threatening the future of our food. Increased incidence of heat, drought, extreme weather events and plant pests and diseases greatly reduce yields of global staple crops such as maize and wheat, putting the food security and livelihoods of farmers and consumers at risk.
    Around the world, farmers, governments, and scientists are working on innovations that can protect food and farming from the worst climate impacts, and also reduce agriculture’s climate footprint.
    At this year’s UN Climate Talks at COP 23 in Bonn, Germany, CIMMYT is highlighting innovations in wheat and maize that can help farmers overcome climate change.
    
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  3. Women and youth help lead efforts to adopt climate-friendly farming and safeguard indigenous maize yields in Mexico. Learn how CIMMYT is helping farming families thrive while fighting climate change here.
  4. India needs to tackle greenhouse gas emissions from its rice and livestock sectors according to a study by CIMMYT and partners. Researchers say this can and must be done in ways that improve yields, and sustain food and nutrition security. Learn more about this study here.
  5. A new study shows that drought tolerant maize varieties, developed by CIMMYT scientists, provide farming families in Zimbabwe an extra 9 months of food at no additional cost. Read the full story here.
  6. CIMMYT senior maize breeder Cosmos Magorokosho shows the difference between stress-tolerant hybrid maize and the locally consumed variety at Chiredzi Research Station, Zimbabwe. 
CIMMYT breeders have worked to develop the new maize variety that produces more grain despite severe heat and drought experienced in the region. #cop23 #climateaction #climatechange #food #climate #corn #maize #africa #africafood #heat #drought #science #genetics #breeding #plants #plantbiology #stem #sdgs #ag4sdgs
    CIMMYT senior maize breeder Cosmos Magorokosho shows the difference between stress-tolerant hybrid maize and the locally consumed variety at Chiredzi Research Station, Zimbabwe. CIMMYT breeders have worked to develop the new maize variety that produces more grain despite severe heat and drought experienced in the region. #cop23 #climateaction #climatechange #food #climate #corn #maize #africa #africafood #heat #drought #science #genetics #breeding #plants #plantbiology #stem #sdgs #ag4sdgs
  7. CIMMYT scientist Claire Stirling describes how agriculture can reduce its emissions and adapt to climate change. Read the full story here.
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  9. CIMMYT value chain and poverty specialist Jon Hellin explains how crop-index insurance can help smallholders adopt climate-resilient technologies. Read his CIMMYT News blog here.
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