AIGA Design Archives: 100+ years of history

American Archives Month | October 2016

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  2. AIGA’s Archive Room houses our institutional archives, which date back to 1914. The bulk of the collection comprises printed materials created by and for the AIGA national office.⠀
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More than 1,500 unique items are housed in this archive.⠀
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These include:⠀
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• Exhibition catalogs and design annuals documenting selections from AIGA competitions since 1915 (book design, commercial graphics, TV commercials, print advertisements);⠀
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• Newsletters and journals published since 1922—these tell the story of AIGA;⠀
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• AIGA conference materials since 1985 (registration posters, postcards, programs).⠀
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The archival boxes protect the items from light, dust, and handling. Buffered folders offer additional protection.⠀
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The archives are available for onsite research to AIGA members who’d like an intimate study of the artifacts documenting the org’s history and association with the past century’s most influential designers.⠀
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The Archive Room complements the online AIGA Design Archives, as well as the physical objects of AIGA’s design competition entries dating back to 1980—housed at @denverartmuseum. Books from AIGA’s book competition dating back to the early 1920s are held at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML) at @columbia University’s Butler Library in New York City.⠀
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Credit: © James Ewing. Courtesy Perkins Eastman, 2015⠀
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#AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #archives
    AIGA’s Archive Room houses our institutional archives, which date back to 1914. The bulk of the collection comprises printed materials created by and for the AIGA national office.⠀ ⠀ More than 1,500 unique items are housed in this archive.⠀ ⠀ These include:⠀ ⠀ • Exhibition catalogs and design annuals documenting selections from AIGA competitions since 1915 (book design, commercial graphics, TV commercials, print advertisements);⠀ ⠀ • Newsletters and journals published since 1922—these tell the story of AIGA;⠀ ⠀ • AIGA conference materials since 1985 (registration posters, postcards, programs).⠀ ⠀ The archival boxes protect the items from light, dust, and handling. Buffered folders offer additional protection.⠀ ⠀ The archives are available for onsite research to AIGA members who’d like an intimate study of the artifacts documenting the org’s history and association with the past century’s most influential designers.⠀ ⠀ The Archive Room complements the online AIGA Design Archives, as well as the physical objects of AIGA’s design competition entries dating back to 1980—housed at @denverartmuseum. Books from AIGA’s book competition dating back to the early 1920s are held at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RBML) at @columbia University’s Butler Library in New York City.⠀ ⠀ Credit: © James Ewing. Courtesy Perkins Eastman, 2015⠀ ⠀ #AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #archives
  3. Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 5 is #AskAnArchivist day.⠀
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Have questions about AIGA history, the collections, or archiving? We’ll monitor this space from 2-4pm ET and pass your questions on to our archivist, and then her answers onto you.⠀
⠀
Credit: AIGA Conference Design 1985–2007⠀
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#AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #archives
    Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 5 is #AskAnArchivist day.⠀ ⠀ Have questions about AIGA history, the collections, or archiving? We’ll monitor this space from 2-4pm ET and pass your questions on to our archivist, and then her answers onto you.⠀ ⠀ Credit: AIGA Conference Design 1985–2007⠀ ⠀ #AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #archives

  4. #AskAnArchivist Day: October 5, 2016
  5. #AskAnArchivist: Which designer has the fanciest signature?

Our archivist writes, “I was just admiring the signature of Dr. M. F. Agha, President, The American Institute of Graphic Arts in the exhibition catalogue, AIGA 4th Annual Magazine Show (1953)." Since he also did the illustration, it’s possible (though we don’t know for sure), that he used the same implement to draw both the illustration + his signature.

#AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #signature #fancysignature #illustration
    #AskAnArchivist: Which designer has the fanciest signature? Our archivist writes, “I was just admiring the signature of Dr. M. F. Agha, President, The American Institute of Graphic Arts in the exhibition catalogue, AIGA 4th Annual Magazine Show (1953)." Since he also did the illustration, it’s possible (though we don’t know for sure), that he used the same implement to draw both the illustration + his signature. #AIGAarchives #ArchivesMonth #signature #fancysignature #illustration
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