1. Thank you to everyone who participated or came out for the 2015 David and Lorraine Freed Undergraduate Research Symposium! This year's annual event featured 25 research projects by 31 undergraduate engineering students from Lehigh University and Lafayette College!

    During today's symposium, we'll bring you the latest news, photos, video and more from the through social media, including Flickr, Twitter, Instagram and more! Did you go to this year's symposium? Be part of the story by sharing your photos and video online using the hashtag #lehighengineers!
  2. This year’s first place winner was Lafayette senior civil engineering student Michael Ryan and his research, “Assessment of iron oxide paint pigments recovered from acid mine drainage through selective precipitation.” Ryan has been pursuing his research under the supervision of professor Arthur Kney.

    Second place went to Lehigh bioengineering students Jay Fraser and Kathryn Kundrod for their work on “Microfluidic Capture and Quantification of HIV." Their research was supervised by professor Xuanhong Cheng. Fraser and Kundrod also won the coveted People’s Choice Award.

    Lehigh chemical and biomolecular engineering major Jonathan Witt took third place for his research on “Novel Materials for Cathodes and Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells." Witt’s research was supervised by professor Steven McIntosh.

    Honorable mentions were awarded to Lehigh students Jim Carucci and James Lamberti for their work on “SERVANT: Secure Extensible Residential Virtualized Automation NeTwork”; Lehigh’s Brendan Eckardt for his research, “Purification of Chitosan for Use in Injectabe Bioactive Glass Systems”; and Robert Dunleavy for his research, “Discovery and design of novel biological tools for advanced functional nanomaterials synthesis.”

    Winner: Michael Ryan, “Assessment of iron oxide paint pigments recovered from acid mine drainage through selective precipitation”

    First Runner-Up: Jay Fraser and Kathryn Kundrod, “Microfluidic Capture and Quantification of HIV”
    Second Runner-Up: Jonathan Witt, “Novel Materials for Cathodes and Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells”

    Honorable Mention: Jim Carucci and James Lamberti, “SERVANT: Secure Extensible Residential Virtualized Automation NeTwork”
    Honorable Mention: Brendan Eckardt, “Purification of Chitosan for Use in Injectabe Bioactive Glass Systems”
    Honorable Mention: Robert Dunleavy, “Discovery and design of novel biological tools for advanced functional nanomaterials synthesis”

    People's Choice Award: Jay Fraser and Kathryn Kundrod, “Microfluidic Capture and Quantification of HIV”

  3. Check out the latest photos from the 2015 UGRS on Flickr: flic.kr/s/aHska1tvsB

  4. #Lehigh student research duo Jim Carucci and James Lamberti talk with ECE associate chair Bill Haller about their project "SERVANT: Secure Extensible Residential Virtualized Automation NeTwork" at the 2015 UGRS. #lehighengineers
    #Lehigh student research duo Jim Carucci and James Lamberti talk with ECE associate chair Bill Haller about their project "SERVANT: Secure Extensible Residential Virtualized Automation NeTwork" at the 2015 UGRS. #lehighengineers
  5. #Lafayette student engineer Michael Ryan talks to the judges about his project, "Assessment of Iron Oxide Pigments Recovered from Acid Mine Drainage through Selective Precipitation" at the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh University. #lehighengineers
    #Lafayette student engineer Michael Ryan talks to the judges about his project, "Assessment of Iron Oxide Pigments Recovered from Acid Mine Drainage through Selective Precipitation" at the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh University. #lehighengineers
  6. Jonathan Witt talks to fellow students about his research "Novel Materials for Cathodes and Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" during the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh. #lehighengineers
    Jonathan Witt talks to fellow students about his research "Novel Materials for Cathodes and Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" during the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh. #lehighengineers

  7. #Lehigh student Connor Tench presents "Video-Based Human Activity Detection" during the 2015 UGRS. #lehighengineers
    #Lehigh student Connor Tench presents "Video-Based Human Activity Detection" during the 2015 UGRS. #lehighengineers
  8. Connor Tench ’15 has been doing research with the Summer Mountaintop Experience for the last two years. This year’s research involved Video-Based Human Activity Detection. Tench worked to help find a way to calculate the velocity from video images to help create ambient spaces, allowing spaces to recognize when people are present in a space and to adjust features such as lights and heating to make people more comfortable. By using information about the change in pixels in an image, Tench was able to find out the average velocity of a moving object or person in a video. His project lays out a framework for future work in creating ambient spaces using video-based human activity detection.

    Without the Mountaintop Experience, Tench might have never completed this fantastic research.

    “The Mountaintop Program is a great opportunity to support students like myself in thinking creatively about their disciplines," Tench said. "Lehigh students are already good at thinking critically, but this creative thinking is what is going to allow us to better solve problems.”

  9. #Lehigh CEE's Jordan Greet presents her project, "Behavior of Offshore Wind Turbine Foundations to judges during the 2015 symposium. #lehighengineers
    #Lehigh CEE's Jordan Greet presents her project, "Behavior of Offshore Wind Turbine Foundations to judges during the 2015 symposium. #lehighengineers

  10. #Lehigh student Andre Sukernik talks to fellow #Lafayette research competitors Ollie Fosu and Kyle Phillips about his project, "High Speed Data Processing for Optical Coherence Tomography. #lehighengineers
    #Lehigh student Andre Sukernik talks to fellow #Lafayette research competitors Ollie Fosu and Kyle Phillips about his project, "High Speed Data Processing for Optical Coherence Tomography. #lehighengineers
  11. Andre Sukernik, a senior electrical engineering major, worked on a project regarding optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCTs use light to create three-dimensional images that are often used in cardiology and optometry. Sukernik’s project involved creating a new user interface and speeding up the process of building a complete image. A single image can contain 600,000-700,000 A-Scans, which can take up to three days to be complied into one image. By using a C++ extension and creating a new program, Sukernik improved the speed by 25 times. He added some other features to the equipment, such as allowing users to “re-slice” an image by looking at different angles of an image.

    Suternik has been working on undergraduate research with Lehigh professors for much of his Lehigh career.

    “When I found out about my professor's research," he explained, "I reached out to him via email, and he was very open to working with undergraduate students.”

  12. Robert Hetterich and Joachim Amoah present their #Lehigh research project, "Control-Oriented Predictive Transport Code for Tokamak Plasmas." #lehighengineers
    Robert Hetterich and Joachim Amoah present their #Lehigh research project, "Control-Oriented Predictive Transport Code for Tokamak Plasmas." #lehighengineers
  13. Joachim Amoah ’17 and Robert Hetterich ’16 worked on their project "Control-Oriented Predictive Transport Code for Tokamak Plasmas” over the summer. Amoah and Hetterich created a computer code to simulate fusion reaction. The project focused on allowing trial and error simulations to be run with a computer quickly, rather than using expensive tokamaks or other time consuming existing programs. The students created a control-oriented model, which only takes seconds to run.

    By making the project in MatLab, it allows control engineers to use the software without having to calculate the plasma physics behind the reaction. The new model allows control engineers to focus on certain variables present in the fusion reaction, and to customize conditions to model simulations created in a variety of locations. By comparing their results to results from actual tokamaks, Amoah and Hetterich have been able to judge that their model creates results close to previous tests done in physical tokamak models. The team hopes to continue making the model more accurate and easy to use for future simulations.

  14. #Rivalry150 isn't just for the football field! Student researchers from #Lafayette are also on hand again for this year's symposium:
  15. #Lafayette research student Rachel Elias talks to judges during the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium about her project, "Biodiesel Structure Property Correlations for Cold Weather Applications" at #Lehigh University. #lehighengineers
  16. Kyle Phillips and Olli Fosu, students from #Lafayette, present their research, "Separation and Classification of EEG Responses to Color Stimuli" at the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh. #lehighengineers
    Kyle Phillips and Olli Fosu, students from #Lafayette, present their research, "Separation and Classification of EEG Responses to Color Stimuli" at the 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium at #Lehigh. #lehighengineers
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