1. It's Prevention of Animal Cruelty Month! Go orange for animals and spread the word about preventing animal cruelty! #NKAC #UNL #GoOrangeForAnimals #PreventionOfAnimalCrueltyMonth #preventanimalcruelty
    It's Prevention of Animal Cruelty Month! Go orange for animals and spread the word about preventing animal cruelty! #NKAC #UNL #GoOrangeForAnimals #PreventionOfAnimalCrueltyMonth #preventanimalcruelty
  2. In 2005, Karen McMeekin founded the A Time 4 Paws No Kill adoption center in Crossville, Tenn., where residents in the Cumberland County area can adopt locally rescued cats and dogs. Volunteers also attend public events and plan educational programs for children with the goal of establishing a community that supports the no-kill philosophy.
  3. McMeekin said, "I learned through the No Kill Advocacy Center and from reading 'Redemption,' the book 'Irreconcilable Differences’ and ‘Friendly Fire:’ three books from Nathan Winograd, who is the president of the No Kill Advocacy Center – who travels all over the United States, runs workshops and who has just made a movie out of the book ‘Redemption.’"
  4. Reducing pet euthanasia.flv
  5. Through the No Kill Advocacy Center's publications, Winograd has documented that more than 23 million people plan to adopt a pet each year. Seventeen million Americans from that number can be influenced to adopt a dog or a cat from a shelter, yet four million companion animals are euthanized in shelters annually. In a 2012 interview with Fox 13 in Tampa Bay, he said, "We don’t have a pet overpopulation problem. We have a market share problem, and, when shelters compete for the market share of animals, animals live instead of die.”
  6. The goal of No Kill animal programs is to save 99 percent of the animals in their communities with an 11-step strategic "No Kill Equation" plan. Legislators throughout the United States, who support the Companion Animal Protection Act, have presented bills to make this plan a state law. Senator Bill Stanley (R-VA) sponsored the most recent bill signed into law by Governor Terry McAuliffe (D) on March 25. Texas is also considering a animal shelter reform bill (SB 1781) sponsored by Senator José Menéndez (D).
  7. Can the majority of shelter animals be saved? There are 11 steps to YES!
    Can the majority of shelter animals be saved? There are 11 steps to YES!
  8. McMeekin has been trying to involve the city and county government in the no-kill philosophy since 2004.
  9. She said, "There is a solution to killing. It’s proven. It’s all over the United States. There are entire counties. There are entire states that are No Kill now. So for us to still be killing because I’m told there are ‘too many’ or ‘they’re too sick’ or ‘they’re too old,’ we don’t agree.
  10. "I have personally given the literature to local rescues, the local shelter and the mayors on how to become a no-kill community – that it actually saves money for the community, but still we have not come to that point. But we won’t give up. We’ll keep going.”
  11. The Blout County Humane Society in Maryville, Tenn., maintains a 99 percent save rate, which has been verified by the Saving 90 organization. McMeekin believes Cumberland County can also be a model for Tennessee animal welfare reform.
  12. AT4P supports an adoption center, a thrift store and a pet hotel. The group is making plans to move to a new, larger facility on Cook Road in the coming months and will make announcements on its Facebook page. McMeekin said that, eventually, she would like to move the adoption center to a 100-acre-plus area to establish a sanctuary. Anyone open to donating land for this project can contact McMeekin at 931-456-6906 or savetnpets@gmail.com.
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