At #FakeNewsBoston, a Look at the Changing Media Landscape

Journalists and media experts gathered in Boston to discuss how to define journalism in a post-truth era.

  1. The term "yellow journalism" was coined by Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst in late 1800s to describe sensational or misleading news stories that both publishers used to drive up sales of the New York City newspapers. Outrageous, believable-but-false news existed long before then, but while people used to have to go out of their way to find fake news stories in the big-city papers, these days the fake news comes to us directly via TV and cable news services, social media, the internet and, yes, newspapers and magazines. At the #FakeNewsBoston event hosted by the PR and marketing firm LEWIS on May 18, 2017, the panelists -- Laura Hazard Owen (@laurahazardowen), deputy editor for Nieman Journalism Lab and Nieman Foundation at Harvard University, Evan Horowitz (@GlobeHorowitz), policy writer and columnist of the “Quick Study” column for Boston Globe, and Dan Kennedy (@dankennedy_nu), associate professor at Northeastern University, author, blogger at Media Nation and nationally known media commentator -- and moderator Lylah M. Alphonse (@WriteEditRepeat), Managing Editor of News for U.S. News & World Report, talked about topics ranging from confirmation bias, censorship and social media to fake news vs. satire, punditry and whether it's possible for legitimate news organizations to defend themselves in the current age of fake news.

    Here's a look at the highlights of the discussion.
  2. We started things off by introducing the panelists, from left: moderator Lylah M. Alphonse (@WriteEditRepeat), Managing Editor of News for U.S. News & World Report; Laura Hazard Owen (@laurahazardowen), deputy editor for Nieman Journalism Lab; Evan Horowitz (@GlobeHorowitz), a Boston Globe columnist, and Dan Kennedy (@dankennedy_nu), associate professor at Northeastern University, author and blogger at Media Nation. We also asked them where they get their news. Popular choices: The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, NPR and U.S. News & World Report.
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